Posts Tagged ‘Nemosine’

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Nemosine Singularity On Sale

11/14/2018

Pen Chalet has the Nemosine Singularity on sale. Nemosine.com has them as well. If you’ve had an urge to try this model, grab it now. As they say, supplies are limited.

Links to a few of my posts about the Singularity:

Nemosine Singularity Stub – First Look

Nemosine Singularity Fountain Pens

Fountain Pens Are Cool

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Fountain Pens Are Cool

11/02/2018

Last week, HisNibs.com shared a link to a Bloomberg article about fountain pen ink that stated, “Worldwide, fountain pen sales are forecast to total $1.15 billion this year, up 3 percent from 2017 and almost 31 percent from a decade ago, according to market-research company Euromonitor International.” Yes, fountain pens are cool and so is ink.

An inkophile needs a stable of pens to test and compare several colors at the same time. A five-pen rotation works well for me and for a reasonable investment, these are some of my favorite models.

  • Pilot Metropolitan – My three are good writers, but might seem slender in a large hand.
  • Pilot Kakuno – Mine has a good nib and adds virtually no weight to my kit.
  • Platinum Plaisir – Good nibs and attractive colors. Slightly larger than the Metropolitan.
  • Kaweco Sport – Modern pocket pen works well in small spaces. Nibs can be swapped.
  • TWSBI Eco – Small nib and simple design, but folks swear by the Eco. The Diamond 580 is my preferred model.
  • Lamy Safari – Sturdy build, but the grip is awkward for some users. Nibs can be good if finicky about ink. The Studio is my preferred model for an everyday pen.
  • Nemosine Singularity – Good build for the price. My italics work best with well-lubricated inks.
  • Conklin Duragraph – The stub nibs are smooth and juicy. I liked the design and performance well enough to purchase two.

Although I have owned a few inexpensive Chinese pens that wrote well enough, most brands have been too inconsistent to recommend. However, for the modest investment, they could be worth the gamble. Amazon and eBay offer quite a few, but you might have better luck at His Nibs.

The Pilot Metropolitan has emerged as my favorite fountain pen for ink testing because it cleans easily and flows well with every ink. The Duragraph with its wide nib is good for general writing so it will often get filled with an ink I would use for a journal or correspondence. The Kakuno or the Singularity come out to play when aqua ink is on the menu. The Nova Orange Plaisir is happy with orange ink or sometimes a fill of Noodler’s Lexington Gray. Either way, it makes my desk look cheerful.

My current pen rotation for testing ink includes

  • Silver Pilot Metropolitan – green ink
  • Aqua Pilot Metropolitan, Kakuno, or Nemosine Singularity – blue/aqua ink
  • Plaisir – red/orange ink
  • TWSBI – purple/burgundy ink
  • Duragraph – black/brown ink

That makes five pens for under $150. Or a mix of Metropolitans and Plasirs could be put together for less than $75. Add a selection of ink samples and you are on your way to being a collector. Now wasn’t that easy!

Though I have never needed to make a return, do purchase where that would be easy. Low-end pens can be imperfect by some accounts though I suspect that is less common with the pens on my list.

Most of the links are to Amazon from which Inkophile receives a tiny commission when you buy within 24 hours of clicking the link. Thank you for your support.

 

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Sunday Reads: Pens, Hummingbirds, and Elephants

08/14/2017

Elephants and hummingbirds fascinate me so this past week offered some special treats. A watercolor demonstration has inspired me to try painting elephants. It’s way outside my skill level, but fun nevertheless…

Anyone else a sucker for demos?

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Diamine Aqua Blue

06/05/2016

Aqua is one of my happy colors especially in a transparent pen. While going through old color swatches, I came across a squiggle of Diamine Aqua Blue and that squiggle is all the use it ever got. Nothing wrong with it, but other colors clamored more loudly for attention and so it got pushed to the back of the shelf.

Two days ago Aqua looked just right so the bottle moved to the front of the queue. The stingy Nemosine 0.8 italic nib volunteered to take it for a test drive probably thinking the ink would not be up to the task. Much to everyone’s surprise, on cheap paper the duo produced a very consistent line with the lightest touch. No feathering though some of the outlines are rough. Like Diamine Peach Haze, it did bleed and show through on copy paper. All my hand noticed was that the writing was smooth and stress free. The nib didn’t skate, but it did move comfortably well.

Mild shading is more pronounced on Clairefontaine though the nib didn’t glide quite as easily on the coated surface. No feathering, bleed-through or show-through, but Clairefontaine never has those problems anyway.

Whether a short-term problem or a long-term condition, there are times when writing can be a challenge. At the end of a long day and for the effortless writing, Diamine Aqua Blue is a rich color that makes filling pages with swirls, letters and doodles a delightful activity.

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The Need To Ink

11/23/2015

If we can only wield one fountain pen at a time, why do we ink so many? Variety in pen style and nib shape might justify a few, but not the huge number some of us wind up with despite the best of intentions. Is ink the true seductress?

These days, my activities rarely require more than one or two pens for daily writing and seldom more than three for an extended session. Once my choice has been made and the words flow, it’s full steam ahead with whatever is in hand. That hardly explains the number typically inked in the tray on my desk.

Often my fascination with color overrides my common sense and a quick dozen pens get filled before I put on the brakes. Add that to my core rotation and presto there are twenty at the ready. That is far and away too many, but it is incredibly satisfying.

But if I ink only one or two, would the other pens get sad or feel neglected or even jealous? The cacophony coming from the pen drawer would be downright distracting and might drive poor Macy crazy with her canine ear for the tiniest sound. A fly two rooms away makes her head flip around with astonishing speed. She already chatters more than any dog ought to and the jabbering of the pen crew would no doubt set her off all too easily. Now if she would just bark, growl and mutter in vermillion, aubergine and cornflower blue, I would be delighted to encourage her antics. In neutral tones, not so much.

How do you cope with the need to ink and the excess on your desk? Do your pens shout for attention or do you have a complacent crew?

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November Pens And Inks

11/13/2015

November pens and inks comprise a colorful palette for paper tests and a few letters. Midori Traveler’s Notebook takes it all in stride.

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Big Bad Fountain Pen Nibs

09/30/2015

Here are some of the pens on my desk that have wide, stock nibs. None of them have received any tinkering. Purchase one, and you should see comparable performance.

The paper is Staples Bagasse that showed a little feathering with the wettest nibs. The worst offender was DeA Cola which has exhibited that fault on a few other brands of paper and the Duragraph which is certainly a free-flowing nib. Perhaps not the best combination, but I am still enamoured with it. The most well behaved was the Platinum Century Nice Pur B with Platinum Pigment Blue. No matter how long it goes unused, the nib flows without hesitation. Considering how many pens I have inked, that is a very, very good thing.

 

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