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Platinum Nibs, Diamine And Leuchtturm1917

02/07/2016

Last night two Platinum Century pens shouted for attention following weeks of being on the back bench. How could I refuse?

The good news is that the nibs wrote beautifully from the first stroke despite a lack of recent exercise. The Century certainly can go a long time without attention. Both are smooth, but there is a slight difference between the medium and the soft medium. The latter has a cushioned feel to it which reduces feedback. The line width of the soft medium might be a tad more narrow, but that could be attributed to the ink. Both nibs are in the workhorse category. Use them for anything.

Next to Noodler’s and J. Herbin, Diamine is the brand of ink that got the most time in my pens last year. Wild Strawberry and Merlot were gifts from Beth Treadway and have proven good additions to my regular rotation. Merlot dries more slowly, but for the saturated color, I can be patient.

The Leuchtturm1917 remains one of my favorite journals though it could be better. If you look closely, the inks found threads to follow and produced more bleed-through than I would like. The previous night I used a Platinum #3776 music nib with J. Herbin Cafe des Iles that produced neither feathering nor bleeding. Pelikan Violet, Waterman Florida Blue, and Noodler’s Apache Sunset performed better on the paper than any ink except Noodler’s Black.

Does this mean Diamine inks have a problem or is the Leuchtturm paper inconsistent? Either way it’s a reminder that testing ink is valuable. The last page in a notebook is a convenient place to write the names of pens and inks for future reference. My sample page produced mixed results, but I now know which duos would be best to grab for a long day of note taking.

The Platinum Century M and SM are delightful to use and I love the soft Leuchtturm paper even with its imperfections so I want to pair the paper with inks that will not feather or bleed. Noodler’s Black and Lexington Gray might just do the trick. Not colorful, but oh so reliable. Sometimes that’s all you need.

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Calligraphy, Pen, And Paper Links Plus A Naked Ninja

02/07/2016

Except for the ninja, this was a thematic week…

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If You Haven’t Seen This Yet

02/01/2016

Be prepared to by charmed by Sloan…

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Moleskine, Cursive, And Chinese Takeout Links

01/31/2016

With politics dominating the news this past week, it was a challenge to find some tasty tidbits, but there were a few…

Bedhead

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Those Last Few Drops Of Ink

01/30/2016

Do you hate throwing out even a few drops of ink? Instead of sending it down the drain or waiting forever to use the last of a fill, make a colorful background for some unique journal pages.

I used leftover watercolor in a mister, but ink will work just fine. Dilute it with water so the color is soft enough to let the written word show clearly. Let the page dry thoroughly before adding words.  These mini misters at Amazon have long straws to suck up the last drop so even a small amount of fluid will be sufficient to decorate a page. As little as a single spritz can add visual appeal to plain paper.

The farther the mister is from the paper, the more diffuse the dots. Once applied the color can be smeared for a different effect. Tilt paper to make large drops spread color in any direction. Absorbent paper will reduce the time available to manipulate the fluid, but the misting will dry more rapidly. It’s a trade off.

If the result lacks color, touch a fountain pen to the wet surface to add more dimension. The same thing works with a rivulet of clear water as Leigh Reyes does in some of her ink and pen videos. If using more than one color but you don’t want the colors to mix, let the paper dry between applications. In my example, the first layer was Daniel Smith Transparent Pyrrol Orange that dried completely before adding Ultramarine Turquoise. The colors mimic this evening’s sunset and will make a suggestive background for the day’s musings.

Most journal paper will buckle, so use a light application. This Midori #013 with Tomoe River paper only wrinkled where there was a substantial amount of water. This technique will also work on plain stationery and blank greeting cards that are compatible with fountain pen ink.

Experiment with mixing colors. Even the muddy neutrals that can result from mixing more than two colors will make subtle, misted backgrounds.

Whether you play connect the dots or write daily musings, have fun with it. That’s what color is all about.

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Links From Moleskine To Horses To Snow

01/24/2016

NYC + snow + chutzpah = FUN!

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Handwriting Day And Five Good Pens

01/23/2016

It’s National Handwriting Day! What better way to celebrate the occasion than by using a few very enjoyable pens. My short list turned out to be varied in nib size as well as price. The inks were randomly selected for paper tests except WFB in the Pelikan. Those two have been dating for years.

  • Pelikan M400 Fine with Waterman Florida Blue
  • Platinum #3776 Music Nib with J. Herbin Terre de Feu
  • Platinum Century Nice Medium with Diamine Wild Strawberry
  • TWSBI Diamond 580 1.1mm with Diamine Violet
  • Conklin Duragraph 1.1mm with Noodler’s Apache Sunset

Which duo did you choose today?

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