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Sunday Links: Ink, Books, And Scooby-Doo

03/03/2019

You have probably seen Nick Stewart’s ink and bleach swatches. If you like them, his tutorials might give you just the right amount of encouragement and technique to venture into this intriguing use of fountain pen ink. Both successes and failures could make unique greeting cards. No sense letting an ink splotch go to waste…

From LuxuryBrandsUSA.com

 

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Sunday Links: The Perfect Pizza, A Sausage, And Ink

02/24/2019

A group of links that have nothing to do with one another, but might offer a little something for everyone…

 

 

 

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Flex Nibs And Ink Characteristics

02/10/2019

When it comes to ink, color grabs us first. Whether the jewel-toned dual colors that have emerged in recent years or the traditional single colored inks that have been around forever, it is the property we prize the most. But what else does fountain pen ink have to offer?

Prior to the introduction of inks that sheen and shimmer, more subtle characteristics like shading and outlining (sometimes called haloing) received the attention and praise of aficionados. They are natural properties of some inks that can lend the written word a very unique look.

Shading happens when ink pools usually at the bottom of a letter. The higher concentration of ink produces a deeper shade than the upper portion. Outlining is a thin, dark line around a letter and is less common than shading. Flex nibs produce it best though wide nibs can do it, too.

Writing examples that illustrate shading and outlining.

Noodler’s Standard Flex and Apache Sunset

Platinum Century FF and Iroshizuku fuyu-syogun

Namiki Falcon SF and Diamine Mediterranean Blue

Noodler’s Standard Flex and Australian Roses

Noodler’s Konrad and Blue Nose Bear

Namiki Falcon SF and Noodler’s Kiowa Pecan

Noodler’s Dostoyevsky

Esterbrook 9128 with Namiki Blue

Platinum Music Nib and Diamine Sepia

 

Diamine Sepia will outline well, but paper may matter more with it than the other inks.

There are too many inks on the market these days to test them all so my list is rather short. You may find inks you already own will outline when used with a soft or flexible nib. There are a few relatively inexpensive fountain pens that would be up to the task of testing ink, but in that category, I only have experience with Noodler’s Standard Flex Pen. It might be better called a soft nib, but it will, with a little practice, produce enough line variation to tease an outline from an ink that is so inclined.

A thread at FPN offers more suggestions. I have used a few of the inks mentioned but have experienced different results or at least less dramatic results. Diamine Wild Strawberry is a case in point. It is excellent in my Platinum Century Nice medium nib with good performance all around. Though it produces crisp edges, the outlines are so close in color to the ink, that they are only discernable under magnification. Thus it outlines but not in a meaningful way. Some of the other inks mentioned in the FPN thread look promising and several are truly dazzling especially those from Robert Oster and Blackstone.

Does outlining appeal to you? Let me know if you discover an ink that does it well. Not that my ink collection needs to be expanded, but for outlining, I could make an exception or two.

 

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Lots Of Pens On Sale

02/07/2019

May I enable you? iPenStore has a bunch of pens on sale in case you are in need of a new fountain pen. And really, who doesn’t need/want another fountain pen?

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Two Questions For You

02/04/2019

File this under Ink Trivia.

  1. Which was your first bottled ink?
  2. Would you or have you repurchased it?

Parker Penman Ebony was my first bottled ink. I used it mainly for drawing until some folks at Fountain Pen Network went all “drama queen” about how it was dangerous stuff and any pen that even caught sight of it would die instantly. Thankfully, it had yet to be paired with my newly acquired vintage Parker 51. Being a newbie and trusting “the experts” cured me of ever using Ebony again. Into the trashbin it went.

Years later, I learned that Ebony just needed regular maintenance due to its heavy dye load and I greatly regretted tossing that luscious, dense ink. Discontinued in 2000, these days a bottle goes for upwards of $70 or more on eBay. No replacement bottle in my future, but Platinum Carbon Black is a worthy substitute for drawing.

So that is the tale of my first bottle of ink. What is yours?

Below is an ink comparison made several years ago. None is as rich as Penman Ebony, but I still use Noodler’s Black as an all-purpose ink and Herbin Perle Noire for general writing as well as in finicky pens. The remaining inks are fine but less neutral than the first two. Who knew black came in such variety!

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My Bent Nib Fountain Pen Has Taken A Hike

01/27/2019

Phooey. Apparently one of my bent nib fude* pens has run away from home. Most assuredly this was an unauthorized departure although I suppose it could be in hiding in the jumble that passes for my office. Not that it is likely to find its way to you, but should it make the trek, please tell it to go home. It might not be my ideal mate, but we did have fun together and there could be many more adventures to come. However, it has to return to make that happen.

Duke Guan Yu Calligraphy Fountain Pen

Just in case the truant does not decide to come home, I looked for possible replacements at Amazon and was surprised to find several. The length of the nib tip varies, but there are a few models to consider for less than $30.

  • The Duke 551 Confucius is similar to my Guan Yu model. Both are metal and quite heavy but attractive enough to start conversations while doodling at a local cafe.
  • Sailor offers an inexpensive model with either a high angle or a low angle nib and a long barrel so it can be held like a paintbrush. It does not come with a converter.
  • For a more traditional-looking pen, Sailor offers a Profit with a fude nib. It is a high angle model with no converter.

A long fude tip like mine is better at drawing than writing. The shorter tip is easier to control but produces less dramatic lines. Leigh Reyes wrote about this nib several years ago. Her post would be a great place to start if the fude intrigues you. It certainly enabled me!

*From Wikipedia fude (foo day) means sequences of letters or drawings that you write or draw without removing your pen off the paper.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_counter_word

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Sweet Deal On A Pilot Vanishing Point At Goldspot Pens

01/17/2019

Goldspot Pens is offering the metallic Pilot Vanishing Point at an excellent price that includes a free bottle of Iroshizuku ink as well as free shipping. If you have ever wanted to buy a VP, this is the best deal I have ever seen for this pen. Grab one while you can!

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