Posts Tagged ‘Fountain Pens’

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Favorite Pens And Inks Updated

05/24/2022

Today I updated my lists of favorite pens, inks and paper plus some of the best combinations I have used. Some items are vintage and others have been discontinued so you might not find them at your local retailer.

What are some of your favorites? Is your list subject to frequent changes or is it stable?

Favorite Fountain Pens

Favorite Inks

Favorite Paper

Favorite Matches

 

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Inkquiring Minds: TWSBI Declares WAR on Moonman and Narwhal

05/17/2022

Are you interested in a pen world controversy? This excellent video lays it out nicely and some of the comments add to the tale. If nothing else, it is a distraction from world events and the political posturing the media serves us.

Full disclosure: I am months into writing an extensive review of converter pens offered by Moonman, Delike and Majohn. A Delike New Moon 2 fude has been my #1 pen for over a year while the TWSBI 580 hasn’t been filled once. The Delike is a better fit in my hand, is very attractive and its nib is perfect for my journal paper and line-spacing. It’s my if-you-could-only-choose-one pen.

Knockoffs are a frustrating and regrettable hazard these days and certainly China is the worst offender. TWSBI considers Moonman and others to be selling copies of some of their models. Basically, TWSBI has told retailers if they sell Moonman and related pens, they can no longer sell TWSBIs. If TWSBI had a patent on their piston-filler mechanism, I would support enforcing it, but they don’t. If they haven’t filed for one, why not?

Business is business you say? Well, I don’t have to give TWSBI my business or anyone else for that matter. Make a good product and offer it at a fair, dollar-for-value price, and people will come. That’s the best way to beat the competition.

Delike New Moon 2 with a fine fude nib.

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Noodler’s And The Pen Community

05/12/2022

A few folks have gotten their knickers in a twist over pen and ink names. As a result, Noodler’s has changed the names of a number of products. Other manufacturers have given inks new names over the years ostensibly for marketing reasons though apparently the underlying formulas remained unchanged. To be accurate at representation, my policy has been to use the name on the bottle and that will continue. If I ever restock a bottle with a new name, I will make the switch but who uses up Noodler’s ink? Those bottles are huge!

For reference:

Previous Name


Noodler’s Ink

New Name

19010 Kiowa Pecan Pecan
19022 Apache Sunset Southwest Sunset
19028 Ottoman Rose Rose in the Louvre
19029 Navajo Turquoise Mesa Turquoise
19034 Tiananmen Discontinued
19035 Ottoman Azure Azure
19036 Shah’s Rose Pearl Diver Coral
19066 Bernanke Black Brevity Black
19067 Bernanke Blue Brevity Blue
19069 Rome Burning Rome (one antique coin)
19070 Q-E’ternity ($&¢) Brevity Blue-Black
19074 Park Red Discontinued
19085 House Divided Discontinued
19103 Anti-Fascist Blue (X-Feather Blue) X-Feather Blue
19104 Noodler’s 1984 Ink Discontinued
19105 Censor Red Brevity Red
19810 Nikita 4.5 oz w/Free Pen TBD
19814 Dragons Napalm 4.5 oz Free Pen Dragon’s Fire
Noodler’s Fountain Pens
14045 Apache Tortoise Konrad Flex Mesa Tortoise
15045 Apache Tortoise Ahab Mesa Tortoise
15048 Cherokee Pearl Ahab Oklahoma
15049 Comanche Ahab Brazos River
15051 Black Crow Ahab Raven
15054 Huron Ahab Lake Champlain
15055 Iroquois Ahab Lake Erie
15060 Navajo Turquoise Ahab Mesa Turquoise
15063 Pima Tortoise Ahab Canyon Tortoise
15066 Zuni Ahab Wilderness twilight
Standard Flex Nibs
17066 Zuni Std Flex Wilderness Twilight
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Matchy-Matchy In Pink

05/11/2022

Last week I ordered a replacement for a favorite ink along with a pen for a comparison review from Jet Pens. It turns out they are perfectly suited for each other in a matchy-matchy way. Sometimes you just get lucky.

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Do Your Pens Make You Want To Write?

08/31/2021

Do your pens encourage you to write? In the past few months, old favorites as well as a few pens that never received much love got together and invaded my rotation. The final group is a bit different from my usual selection and I am now using several pens that were set aside long ago.

For years stubs and italics with a few exceptions were all I used. No fine or extra-fine nibs suited either my grip or my letter forms. That wasn’t a problem since my writing looked fine and the range of inks I was drawn to were lovely with those pens.

Then I decided to write notes for projects as well as personal musings in a journal, but which one to use?

A Traveler’s Notebook #013 with unlined Tomoe River Paper looked like a suitable size for my needs. So I popped the wrapper off of one, grabbed a 1.1mm stub with vivid ink, wrote a page and was affronted by the result. The journal size and the paper quality were fine but the writing overwhelmed them. It was simply too large and too dark. At the end of the day when I want to capture thoughts on the day’s accomplishments and make notes for future endeavors, something calming and relaxing is in order. In addition, I wanted to use both sides of the paper with a lined guide tucked beneath to keep my writing on the straight and narrow. To do this would require a finer nib and less intense ink. To the pen drawer I went.

Pens from my early days have very fine Japanese nibs, especially Pilot pocket pens and various 1970’s Platinum pens. The more recently acquired Pilot Metropolitans are also fairly narrow. In the western fine nib category, several Levenger True Writers were promising. A Delike New Moon fine fude received a test run as well.

Inks that were certain to be appropriate included several from Herbin, Iroshizuku and Sailor. Diamine had a lock on the brown range with Dark Brown and Raw Sienna. Lots of trial and error and attendant pen cleaning produced a pleasing rotation even if the pens are unusually narrow for me. What counts the most is whether they encourage writing and these are doing just that.

Do you think my wide nibs are jealous from having to cede part of my rotation to their skinny brethren? In truth, there are more inked pens on my desk than in recent memory. So much for my vow to maintain a minimalist rotation. The pens are winning. Who am I to disagree?

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Links To Inks, Pens, and Watercolor Supplies

06/01/2021

Getting back into the swing of things after a long holiday weekend…

From the archives:

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Selling Some of My Best Pens

05/17/2021

Update: All of the pens have been sold. Congratulations to the new owners!

Spring cleaning made it clear that a few of my pens ought to go to writers who will use them more consistently than I have. They aren’t unloved – just unused. Considering the size of my collection, that isn’t surprising especially with my minimal rotation the last few years.

These Platinum #3776 pens are ready for new homes. Only the Chartres Blue shows any sign of use and is priced accordingly. There are writing samples at the end of this post to help you evaluate the nibs.

The Platinum #3776 Century Chartres Blue with a 14K B nib received this remark in a post from a few years ago: “Beautiful, smooth, balanced, and very blue. If you are a collector, purchase one soon to get a serial numbered card indicating your pen was manufactured in the initial run. It won’t cost more but it is kind of cool.” This pen has the nicest B nib I have ever used but it does have some scratches that are visible only at just the right angle. It takes a bright light to bring out the blue color and it usually appears almost black. $110 (PNB-10000 #51-B)

Next is a Platinum #3776 Century Black in Black with gold trim and a 14K SF nib. Note that it is soft and not flex though the box says FF for fine flex. It does give with a little pressure though not comparable to vintage flex. With practice, it can add a bit of character to letter forms and is a solid pen for everyday use. $125 (PNB-10000#1-FF)

The Platinum #3776 Century Yamanaka has a 14K SM nib and will also bend enough to be both comfortable to use as well as to add some line variation to your writing. I am particularly fond of transparent pens and this one has beautiful detailing along with its rhodium nib. $155 (PNB-20000Y #5 SM)

I have written about my Platinum #3776 14K rhodium Music Nib many, many times. It easily ranks in my top five favorite pens. Luckily for you, I have a never-used one to sell. I don’t think this one is a Slip and Seal, but I have never had a problem with ink drying out in mine or the nib failing to start even if left unused for weeks. $130 (PTMB-25000 #1-MU)

With the exception of the music nib, the others are lightly used. Only the Chartres Blue has been filled more than once. Again, I have too many pens to keep them all happy.

Each pen comes in its original box and has a converter. Shipping for a single pen will be $10 that includes $100 insurance to United States addresses only. International shipping is not an option for me at this time so domestic sales only.

  • Contact me at inkophile *at* gmail.com to ask a question or to make a purchase.
  • Payment via Paypal (Friends and family. We are friends, aren’t we?) or Zelle at price plus shipping fee.
  • Shipment within 72 hours of cleared payment.
  • U.S. buyers only.
  • Shipping fee is for Priority Mail.
  • Combined purchases requiring a larger box will increase the shipping fee.
  • If the pen is not as described, please return it within 7 days.

Platinum Chartres Blue B

Platinum Century Black in Black SF

Platinum Century Yamanaka SM

Platinum #3776 Music Nib

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