Posts Tagged ‘Noodler’s Standard Flex Pen’

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Sunday Reads: Pens, Ink And Happy Hour

04/21/2019

So what do pens have to do with happy hour? Read on.

From the archives, my kit from five years ago. Only one pen has remained a constant in my rotation. Can you guess which one?

Pens: Platinum #3776, Noodler’s Standard Flex, the Pilot Prera Italic and the Sheaffer Taranis Medium. Inks: Diamine Sepia, Noodler’s Black Swan in Australian Roses, Noodler’s Black and Diamine Steel Blue. Autopoint Mechanical Pencil, a daily user that has never failed me.

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Flex Nibs And Ink Characteristics

02/10/2019

When it comes to ink, color grabs us first. Whether the jewel-toned dual colors that have emerged in recent years or the traditional single colored inks that have been around forever, it is the property we prize the most. But what else does fountain pen ink have to offer?

Prior to the introduction of inks that sheen and shimmer, more subtle characteristics like shading and outlining (sometimes called haloing) received the attention and praise of aficionados. They are natural properties of some inks that can lend the written word a very unique look.

Shading happens when ink pools usually at the bottom of a letter. The higher concentration of ink produces a deeper shade than the upper portion. Outlining is a thin, dark line around a letter and is less common than shading. Flex nibs produce it best though wide nibs can do it, too.

Writing examples that illustrate shading and outlining.

Noodler’s Standard Flex and Apache Sunset

Platinum Century FF and Iroshizuku fuyu-syogun

Namiki Falcon SF and Diamine Mediterranean Blue

Noodler’s Standard Flex and Australian Roses

Noodler’s Konrad and Blue Nose Bear

Namiki Falcon SF and Noodler’s Kiowa Pecan

Noodler’s Dostoyevsky

Esterbrook 9128 with Namiki Blue

Platinum Music Nib and Diamine Sepia

 

Diamine Sepia will outline well, but paper may matter more with it than the other inks.

There are too many inks on the market these days to test them all so my list is rather short. You may find inks you already own will outline when used with a soft or flexible nib. There are a few relatively inexpensive fountain pens that would be up to the task of testing ink, but in that category, I only have experience with Noodler’s Standard Flex Pen. It might be better called a soft nib, but it will, with a little practice, produce enough line variation to tease an outline from an ink that is so inclined.

A thread at FPN offers more suggestions. I have used a few of the inks mentioned but have experienced different results or at least less dramatic results. Diamine Wild Strawberry is a case in point. It is excellent in my Platinum Century Nice medium nib with good performance all around. Though it produces crisp edges, the outlines are so close in color to the ink, that they are only discernable under magnification. Thus it outlines but not in a meaningful way. Some of the other inks mentioned in the FPN thread look promising and several are truly dazzling especially those from Robert Oster and Blackstone.

Does outlining appeal to you? Let me know if you discover an ink that does it well. Not that my ink collection needs to be expanded, but for outlining, I could make an exception or two.

 

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Sunday Reads: Pens, Memes, And Sherlock Holmes

11/18/2018

There is no connecting the dots between these links, except that they were some of the most interesting ones from this past week.

Noodler’s Standard Flex Pen With Apache Sunset Ink

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A Noodler’s Flex Pen Meets Gorgeous Ink

07/22/2016

Ever wondered what you could do with a Noodler’s Standard Flex pen?

Noodler’s Standard Flex with Noodler’s Black Swan In Australian Roses.

Isn’t the ink pretty in a clear barrel?

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Noodler’s Pen And Ink Make A Happy Duo

01/28/2014

Late last night the urge to refill the Noodler’s Standard Flex Pen struck. Apache Sunset hasn’t seen daylight for a long time, so this was a good opportunity to revisit an ink that has an outstanding reputation for use with a flexible nib. I was not disappointed.

Noodler’s Creaper pen and Apache Sunset ink at Amazon.

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Another Really Good Fountain Pen – This One From Noodler’s

01/05/2014

After watching a few Nathan Tardif videos yesterday, I pulled out a Noodler’s Standard Flex pen that was languishing in a drawer. Following Nathan’s lead, I filled it with Noodler’s Black Swan in Australian Roses to impressive results.

Noodler's Flex Pens

Noodler’s pens come in three sizes of which the Standard is the smallest. The Ahab is the largest while the Konrad is in between. One thing I’ve discovered in the past year is that with the added pressure needed to get those lovely wide lines, a smaller pen works quite well for me and often better than one with a chunkier girth. Consequently, the Standard that I purchased when it was first released has become an excellent size for flex writing even though in the past, it seemed too narrow. One of these models will suit your hand and all come with flexible nibs.

The piston filler works smoothly and the cap screws on tightly. It has a solid feel to its construction and should last a long time. I have the clear version also known as a demonstrator or demo. Years ago clear-bodied pens were used to demonstrate the inner workings. Admittedly it is fun to see that, but the real treat is seeing the color of the ink. For the Standard demo, Noodler’s Apache Sunset, Golden Brown or Black Swan in Australian Roses are beautiful as well as perfect for flex writing.

The nib is stainless and can produce significant line width. The writing sample shows what can be done with very little effort. Note the lack of railroading even when I write rapidly. This is a very well-tuned pen and required no adjustment to achieve excellent results.

The only caveat is the odor. After two years, the cellulose still has that characteristic scent though it has faded considerably with time. The fun of writing with such a flexible nib overrides my dislike, so the Standard Flex will become a regular participant in my rotation. Rubbing my fingers over the stainless steel faucet at my kitchen sink seemed to reduce the mild odor that lingered after a brief session. That trick works on things like onions and garlic, too.

For the connoisseur, the nib isn’t as supple as a Waterman’s Pink Nib, but it is very affordable and easily replaced if lost or damaged. This is the flex nib I would take on the road whether to the neighborhood coffee shop or on a cross country jaunt.

For the newbie, this is the least expensive pen to explore flex writing. Just go easy with applying pressure. Learn the pen’s limits so the tines don’t get damaged when you go for that 1.o mm line.

Forget the low-priced junk on eBay and pick up a Noodler’s Standard Flex pen. At $16 or so, it’s a steal.

Grab one at Peyton Street Pens, but read the cleaning info at Noodler’s Ink. Cellulose can get damaged if cleaned incorrectly.

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