Posts Tagged ‘Paper’

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Sunday Links From Paper To Cursive To Butterflies

06/19/2016

Temps are headed into triple digits so it’s a good day to lay low and take it slow…

Noodler’s Rachmaninoff from Luxury Brands USA lit by flashlight. The tile is white so the ink shared its pinky goodness in every direction. My kitchen is still recovering from the shock.

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Review: Clearprint Vellum Field Book

12/13/2015

Since 1933 Clearprint has offered cotton vellum paper in a variety of forms from 100 yard rolls down to 8.5″ x 11″ sheets. Now offered as a portable field book, this unique paper can fit anywhere including a pocket.

As a child I loved the texture and crinkly sounds from the discarded scraps that came into my hands. To a budding paper hoarder, this was treasure. Not long after rediscovering fountain pens, a packet of vellum made its way into my paper stash and became a happy mate to any fountain pen ink.

What’s not to like about a notebook that is

  • filled with translucent paper
  • works well with any fountain pen ink
  • good for many uses and excels at layering
  • incredibly smooth and kind to nibs
  • good with watercolor though the paper may buckle mildly
  • tough enough to be primed for oil or acrylic painting
  • available in blank or grid (3mm) formats
  • outfitted with a substantial cardboard back for field use
  • made with removable pages
  • free of bleed-through with FP ink though translucency produces show-through

Note that vellum is not absorbent so ink can take a long time to dry. Blotter recommended. That or a ton of patience.

The notebooks come in 3 x 4, 4 x 6, 6 x 8, and 8.5 x 11 inch sizes holding 50 sheets each. Since the sheets detach easily, the 6 x 8 pages could be used for correspondence. I like the thin but sturdy paper for notes to slide between the pages of a book and it is perfect for tracing or overlays.

Got a thing for paper, but aren’t acquainted with vellum? You are in for a treat. If you have experience with vellum, a Clearprint book presents a handy form and size to take this lovely paper on the road if only so far as the local coffee shop.

If you can’t find these notebooks locally, toss one into your shopping cart at Amazon for some good, clean inky fun.

 

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What Do Daleks, Goldfish And Rain Have In Common?

01/19/2012

Not a thing unless you count being mentioned in the same post.😛

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Paper, Pen and Ink – Get The Best For Your Money

11/24/2011

There is nothing quite like getting your hands or eyes on something before you buy it. With few pen stores in any community, online retailers are the only option for most aficionados and reviews the only substitute for that hands-on examination. Before the holiday-rush-to-buy strikes, it’s time for a few tips before adding to your collection.

How often have you been disappointed by fountain pen performance on your newest pad of paper? Your favorite reviewer loved it so what’s the deal? Not foolproof but do check the date of any paper review. The current batch may be vastly different from what was used for an older review. This is particularly true of planners since they are printed new each year. Look for recent reviews for the best skinny on your product of choice.

Ink varies less over time. Formulas may get slight modifications but this is rare for most ink makers. With few exceptions, older reviews should be just as valid today as when written.

Though dye batches can vary, colors remain remarkably similar from bottle to bottle. Ink makers just don’t tamper with their offerings. Nathan Tardif of Noodler’s Ink is the most prominent exception. Recently his #41 Brown had a reformulation that by all accounts is an improvement. The same is true for Baystate Blue as evidenced by samples I received in February.

Noodler’s isn’t the only company to modify a formula on occasion. A few years ago I noticed a subtle change in the color of J. Herbin Cacao du Brésil though the properties remained the same. The difference is hardly noticeable in the more saturated line a fountain pen produces.

That makes three inks that have changed in three years out of over two hundred samples in my collection. “Infrequent” really does apply.

None of this should deter reordering these inks or any others that have been updated if you liked the original formulations. There is little difference in color and performance is often improved.

J. Herbin Cacao du Brésil

J. Herbin Cacao du Brésil

Pens are another matter. Few manufacturers change a design once established. When they do, it is often with fanfare. Search the web to determine whether the pen you covet has been “improved.” If so, check reviews to see whether the new model will fit your requirements.

Quality control seems to be the bigger failing with pens. Getting a stinker stinks but it does happen. Reviews will help you find the worst offenders. Most retailers and manufacturers will back up their products so be persistent and get what you deserve, a delightful fountain pen that will give you years of fine writing.

  • Paper – Check review dates for the most recent evaluations. Some manufacturers are very consistent. Others – not so much.
  • Ink – Look for reformulations that improve color or performance. Make sure your retailer ships the version you want.
  • Pens – Consider design modifications or quality issues before you purchase. What is an improvement for someone else, may be a deal-breaker for you.
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Ten Tuesday Links

11/15/2011

Can’t recall where all these links came from but thanks to those who lead me to them.

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Cursive, Sculpture and Hummus?

07/18/2011

From paper to pens and the future of cursive, enjoy the gallimaufry.

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Pen, Ink, or Paper Poll

03/18/2011

When you have a lot of writing to do, which do you select first?

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