Archive for the ‘Ink’ Category

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Sunday Links From Inks To Pens To Giggles

04/24/2016

March winds have invaded April. The intermittent tapping at my window is a reminder that there is an outside world and the Internet mostly entertainment…

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Mint Ink

04/10/2016

For a hit of mint, either one will do.

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Spring And A Lively Ink Palette

03/27/2016

Chancing upon a written sample of Rouge Caroubier got things started. Quickly, the list grew to this first pass at spring inks:

  • Diamine Meadow
  • J Herbin Rouge Caroubier
  • Sailor Jentle Souten
  • Noodler’s Dostoyevsky
  • Akkerman #22 Hopjesbruin
  • Diamine Peach Haze
  • Sailor Peach Pink
  • J Herbin Violette Pensee

The group ought to get winnowed to five at most, but it is hard to eliminate even one of them.

Five pens were already filled. So rather than waste ink, the palette got changed to Sailor Yama-Dori, Noodler’s Dostoyevsky, Diamine Mint, Diamine Violet, and J. Herbin Cafe des Iles. Those aren’t the inks from my initial list, but they will do.

Rouge Caroubier and Meadow are looking through the pen drawer for suitable partners. Oh, wait, we have winners. Meadow chose the Pel M215 and Caroubier chose the Platinum Nice Pur. Peach Haze is flirting with the amber Conklin Duragraph. Peach Pink remains undecided so that one will have to wait. It’s a pretty color that deserves a clear demo with a wide nib like the TWSBI 580. Perhaps at the next fill. Souten is sulking because his favorite pen, the Pel M215, isn’t available. It will all get sorted eventually.

My three pen rotation has turned into a bouquet of color. What a lovely way to celebrate spring!

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A Little Noodler’s On Noodler’s Action

03/23/2016

This was a Noodler’s month with a gift of three Konrads and three inks from Luxury Brands USA. The little dears went right to work quickly doubling the number of fountain pens on my desk and adding some color to a sedate, black rotation.

Just a couple of days before the shipment arrived, I almost bought an 1820 Essex Konrad, but got sidetracked. Then I was lucky enough to receive one from Carol. Happy me!

Noodler’s labels are miniature works of art. Who needs a fancy bottle when a dramatic label can say so much more?

Playing matchy-matchy for initial matings was easy except for one ink. El Lawrence is truly an odd color. Some folks say it looks like dirty motor oil. With certainty it is a chameleon looking black to charcoal in some lighting conditions and very dark green in others. It is bulletproof, eternal, highly saturated, and slow to dry from a wide or very wet nib. Diluting it with distilled water seems a natural.

Experimentation with fine nibs was in order so the ink went into a vintage Platinum Karakusa EF that brought out its paler side. Even on cheap copy paper, El Lawrence from the narrow nib performed flawlessly revealing a medium charcoal tone to best advantage. With the stingy Plat nib, the ink dried almost instantly which makes it an option for my non-FP notebooks.

Berning Red is a good match for the December 25th Konrad Flex. The ink is eternal and bulletproof and red, red, red. Unfortunately, it feathered on some brands and grades of paper with the strong flow from the Konrad. A more narrow nib and dry flow tamed it as well as improved the drying time. I am a bit hung up on Noodler’s Park Red so Bernie will have to wait for access to the red ink slot in my rotation, but its time will come.

The Essex was a whaling ship out of Nantucket, Massachusetts, that was sunk by a sperm whale in 1820. The event became the inspiration for Herman Melville’s 1851 novel, Moby-Dick. It’s an interesting back story should someone ask about your 1820 Essex. The barrel is in the teal family, though more green than blue, and so is the Dostoyevsky ink. They are quite a pair with shading here and there, as well as outlining in a Leuchtturm1917 journal. However, the heavy ink flow produced bleed through and mild feathering in the journal though not on other brands of paper. Drying time was generally good but not in all cases. With a fine or extra fine nib, that should be less of an issue. This ink and pen combination is so pleasing that they might be mated for life.

Qufu is a city in China’s Shandong province and known for being the hometown of Confucius. The Qufu Jade Konrad Flex represents dark green jade nicely with its deep color and pale swirls.

The Qufu Jade had limited ink choices with only two green Noodler’s on hand. Army looked good with both the barrel and the cap colors so I opted for that one. It’s the brighter green version that Beth Treadway sent last year. Rumor has it that the original drab yellow-green version has been reissued so if your Army doesn’t match the Qufu colors that might be the reason.

As for fit and finish, the Konrads had no manufacturing defects and the pistons slid smoothly from the first twist of the knob. All of the nibs were properly aligned and wrote well at first contact with paper. Note that two received a water bath before being filled and experienced no flow problems. The third did not get a bath and clogged after a half page. Oops.

The Konrad is made from a cellulose derivative and is biodegradable, not that you would allow yours to wind up in a landfill. But it does make the pen light-weight. Even with the cap posted on the end of the barrel, the balance is good creating a comfortable writing experience.

All three pens are rated flex. However, it takes some effort to produce varying line widths. Writing with normal pressure yields a fine-medium line. Over time it may take less effort to flex the nib, but I have found that trying to make the pen flex beyond a certain point will thereafter widen the unflexed line width. The nib isn’t as narrow as an Esterbrook 9128, but it is more smooth and useful for general writing than many of the lower-end vintage flex nibs.

Noodler’s pens have a distinctive odor that usually dissipates over time. The Essex is slightly less fragrant than the other two, but all three are much less powerful than pens from a couple of years ago. Leaving an empty pen uncapped for a time should hasten the reduction of the odor.

These latest Konrads are a great value and Noodler’s ink is no less. Add a little distilled water and that 3 ounce bottle will last ages. Whether you flex your nib or not, it’s hard to beat this bang-for-the-buck duo.

Thank you, Carol, for sending the pens and inks. My desk is now remarkably colorful and so is my writing.

 

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Ink Samples And The Rice Trick

03/18/2016

This is so simple and useful. Fill a small jar with rice and push an ink sample to the bottom. Remove the bottle cap and fill your pen. Voilà!

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What Pen Cleaning Day Left Behind

03/08/2016

Clean pens, inky water, and a colorful paper towel…

My inked pens are down to three. It’s like going from long hair to a buzz cut, breezy and easy to maintain.

The skinny rotation won’t last long with a shipment due end of week, but it’s fine for now. A person could grow accustomed to living this way. For now, I am a lean, mean writing machine.

However, pen and paper tests require more variety. Though increasing the number of pens is not appealing, adding a red and a blue ink should be adequate for the next reviews. Noodler’s BERNing Red is en route which settles that color. For blue, should it be Sailor Sky High or Souten, Iroshizuku kon-peki, Noodler’s Ottoman Azure or Rohrer & Klinger Verdigris or Blau Permanent? As always, it’s hard to pick just one.

Two green inks of recent acquisition, Diamine Meadow and Noodler’s Gruene Cactus, deserve further exploration especially in clear barrels that show their inky colors to best advantage. The TWSBI Eco is almost empty and would look suitably, seasonally well-dressed in green. Well, at least that’s settled.

That limited rotation of red, blue, brown, violet and green always grows quickly to an unwieldy dozen with the addition of teal, turquoise, orange, burgundy, pink, and black or blue-black. That’s eleven with one slot open for a test ink. This is not promising. How do you inkophiles keep your rotation in check?

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Ink Miser Will Grab That Last Drop Of Ink

03/06/2016

Luxury Brands has created innovative new products to get that last drop of ink from the bottle to the pen. Tall bottles will no longer be a problem and for Noodler’s fans, this is especially good news.

The Ink Miser Intra-Bottle Inkwell fits inside a bottle neck, but is deeper than the wells I’ve seen elsewhere. It is a perfect fit for Noodler’s and should accommodate even the largest nibs. It can be used to raise the ink level for small pens and make it easier to fill lever-fillers. If you like Noodler’s, this will be a very useful tool.

The Ink Miser Ink-Shot is a free-standing inkwell. Pour ink into it and fill your pen. It can also be used to soak a pen in a minimal amount of water or cleaning fluid while keeping the barrel dry. It’s a unique way to protect a vintage pen from water damage or from becoming stained by dirty water. I expect a few of these will be in constant use around here.

Seriously simple and made from durable polypropylene, both the Intra-Bottle Inkwell and Ink-Shot should last a very long time. Watch these brief videos to see them in action.

Luxury Brands announced their new products only yesterday so retailers should have inventory very soon. Pop them into your next order. You might not need one now, but you surely will in future.

 

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