Posts Tagged ‘Pilot Prera’

h1

Sunday Reads: Pens And Cats Are Cool

03/18/2018

If you are not familiar with David Isaacson and Vacumania, now is the time to get acquainted. He knows more about pens than the rest of us combined and he always has beautifully restored vintage pens on offer. At the other end of the spectrum, Fountain Pen Quest reviews disposable pens. It may not be your cuppa, but it is the safest way to introduce a novice to fountain pens without risk to your precious and pricey babies…

Advertisements
h1

The Colors Of San Juan Streets At Dusk

09/04/2014

With eight of the paints from my newest watercolor palette, I was able to mix some muted colors that reminded me of San Juan streets at dusk. This kit holds twelve pans, takes up very little space, and travels well. It won’t hold all of my favorite colors, but a small box of extras is always an option. Painting in a café with a waterbrush, a Stillman & Birn sketchbook and this little kit is all it takes to make me a happy camper. Yeah, I’m easy.

 

This setup includes a Pilot Prera filled with Noodler’s Black, a Kuretake waterbrush, Stillman & Birn Zeta Sketchbook and a metal watercolor box containing

  • Neutral Tint
  • Hansa Yellow Medium
  • Scarlet Lake
  • Permanent Rose
  • Manganese Blue
  • Cerulean Blue
  • Prussian Blue
  • Sap Green
  • Yellow Ochre
  • Light Red
  • Burnt Sienna
  • Perylene Green

 

h1

I Cheated But Just A Little

03/28/2014

Taking a cue from my Colorful Background post, I sploshed some blue and green watercolors on a page in a Stillman & Birn Epsilon Sketchbook. Unlike the artist who made the video in my post, I didn’t want to write on the painting so I cheated, but just a little.

The trick was to make the words temporary without obscuring the background painting. After a few so-so ideas, I remembered a packet of translucent vellum that disappeared years ago. It took some time to locate, but provided the perfect solution.

With a Pilot Prera/Plumix Italic and Noodler’s Black ink, I wrote the Eurythmics lyric several times on the vellum until it looked suitable. A little paper tearing produced uneven edges that echoed the watercolor. Then I made another written piece using a Uchida Gold Opaque Paint Marker. With a Scotch Wrinkle-Free Glue Stick, I attached the written words to the watercolor. Lastly, a swath of gold dots on the left side and the page was complete.

The Daniel Smith watercolors are from my basic palette and include Cobalt Blue, Ultramarine Turquoise, and Green Gold with a touch of Ultramarine Blue. I may have inadvertently dipped my brush in Sap Green on one pass, so that could be added to the list or not.

Epsilon paper is 150gsm so it can handle a fair amount of liquid, but it still required quick work to keep things fresh and flowing. The Isabey Petit Gris Mop brush from Leigh was perfect for the loose wash. It holds a huge amount of paint and added to the fun of getting the colors to mingle on the paper.

If you aren’t into painting, a similar background effect can be achieved with wide or brush markers. The latter works extremely well when held horizontally, almost parallel to the paper. Another option is to doodle with Sharpies and write with a fountain pen over your design.

If you want to write with a fountain pen more than paint colorful backgrounds, Jet Pens has a fun palette that could be used to create a pale wash of color over which ink will stand out nicely. More about the Yasutomo Niji Pearlescent set next week, but it could make a good starting point paired with a waterbrush. It does take a few drops of water to get the paint thick enough to put down significant color. However, a less saturated look might be just the thing to make your writing stand out on the page.

Whatever way you go, writing over a colorful background adds pizazz to your words. If it inspires you to write, so much the better. Play with it and have fun. That’s what should happen with all artistic endeavors.

Speaking of having fun, I think I’ll add a few more gold dots. One can never have too much gold, right?

h1

Moleskine And Fountain Pen Ink

03/23/2014

Another test with Moleskine and fountain pen ink, but this time with italic nibs.

Noodler’s Blue Eel isn’t bad though the bleed-through limits writing to only one side of the paper. Noodler’s Black paired with a Pilot Prera and a Plumix medium italic nib performed so well that there wasn’t even a dot of bleed-through. No feathering to speak of either.

Writing with a wide nib on both sides of Moleskine paper? Shocking I tell you. Shocking!

h1

Clairefontaine 1951 Notebook And A Giveaway

03/09/2014

Clairefontaine paper is always fountain pen-friendly and the 1951 notebook is no exception. Exaclair sent the red, cloth-bound version for review, but what do you say when something is perfect?

The Back to Basics 1951 reintroduces Clairefontaine’s original notebook covers plus
  • 90 g pH neutral, acid-free paper
  • Smooth satin finish, white paper
  • Grained paper cover with front label
  • Vintage look and feel
  • Clothbound comes with 96 sheets, lined, in one size (A5)
  • Clothbound cover colors include black, violet, red, green, blue, turquoise
  • Also available in staple and wirebound versions

The Pilot Preras look and work especially well with the red cover and white paper. The images tell the tale.

My nibs and handwriting are large so the 0.8mm line spacing works fine though it might be a bit generous for some writers. When I wrote with extra-fine nibs and much smaller handwriting, I could write two lines in that space. Needless to say I got my money’s worth out of a notebook back then. I’m more of a paper snob these days and Clairefontaine’s smooth finish is just right for my stub and sharp italic nibs.

Easily one of the best notebooks on the market for FP nuts, the 1951 won’t disappoint. Want to give it a try? Clairefontaine’s U.S. distributor Exaclair is sponsoring a giveaway through An Inkophile’s Blog. Cool, eh? To enter simply post a comment below about how you would use a 1951 notebook and which color strikes your fancy. Please include your email address in the comment form so that I can contact you if you are the winner. This giveaway is open to residents of the U.S. only. The winner will be selected via Random.org. The contest closes at 6 pm PDT on March 17, 2014. The winner will be announced thereafter and will have until March 24, 2014 to claim the prize.

Comments are moderated to eliminate spam, so allow time for that step. Only one entry per person and duplicate postings will be removed.

My thanks to Karen at Exaclair for sending the 1951 to review and for sponsoring a giveaway. Let the contest begin!

h1

On My Desk – February 2014

02/27/2014

Well, sort of. These are the inks in use today from the assortment of pens on my desk. The tally is telling with seven of nine in the blue family. The nibs are with one exception in the wide range and only the Platinum and Lamy nibs were not tweaked in some way. The paper is the outstanding Tomoe River from PaperForFountainPens.com. It might be unfair that it makes every ink and nib look good, but that’s hardly a complaint.

March is the month in which green ink invariably gets a twirl. This year it will be either J. Herbin Lierre Sauvage or Iroshizuku Shin-Ryoku or possibly both. Now for the pen. Italic or flex? Which would you choose for green ink?

The ink colors could be more saturated and the paper is actually a warm white, but adjusting the scan might make it less honest. So no adjustments this time.

h1

Falling In Love With An Old Friend

02/04/2014

Acquiring new pens is a rarity here. So repairing old ones and pairing them with well-suited inks adds a freshness to my rotation. A few weeks ago, the Pilot Preras became winners. Then last night I took my own advice and attempted to rescue another pen.

This time it was an old friend, the early 1990’s blue marble Pelikan M200 that has long suffered from a stuck piston. As a result of that affliction, this poor pen has endured years of neglect. Screwing up some courage, I unscrewed the original extra-fine nib, wiggled the knob with a gentle rocking motion, and was surprised to find that the piston now moved freely. The extra-fine nib did not fit my current preference, but an unattached Binder modified stub would do. So I fitted the nib and pen together creating a lovely Pelikan stub.

To help the piston glide in the chamber, its inaugural fill is Noodler’s Blue Eel, a lubricating ink. On Apica 6A10 paper, the nib has proven a smooth writer that lays down a satisfyingly wide line. Leafing through my ink notes, I found four additional inks that would be compatible with the barrel: Noodler’s Navy, Noodler’s 54th Mass., Diamine Prussian Blue, and Iroshizuku tsuki-yo. J. Herbin Perle Noire or Noodler’s Black would be good in it, too. It’s going to be fun finding another perfect match or two.

A word of caution is in order. I was willing to further damage the Pelikan and send it off to hospital if my efforts proved disastrous. For a pen that was receiving no use, it was worth a try. Worst case would have been a relatively easy repair for someone who knows their stuff. I do have a pot of a proper piston lubricant should that have been needed. So compared to other repairs, this situation presented an acceptable risk.

Making minor adjustments to the Preras and the Pel has been very effective. I have three “new” pens to love and it isn’t even Valentines Day yet. What a great start to a new year!

Pelikan Pens History

%d bloggers like this: