Archive for the ‘Doodles & Journals’ Category

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Sunday Reads: Ink, Pens, and Writing

04/23/2017

Wilted this week with temps over 90 degrees, but still found a few good articles to share.

An old rotation that still has much appeal.

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Sunday Reads: Pens, Inks and Paper. Oh, my!

04/09/2017

Want to expand your collection? There are eight reviews in this lot to help you choose what’s next.

From the archives…

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A Little Inspiration

03/27/2017

A few videos to inspire and encourage the doodler in you:

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Sunday Reads: This ‘n That

03/26/2017

Various subjects…

Diamine Vermilion

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Sunday Reads: Oodles Of Pen, Paper And Ink Links

02/19/2017

That’s a first. I’ve never used “oodles” in a post, but for this bunch, it seemed just right.

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What Prompts You To Journal?

01/18/2017

What prompts you to write in your journal? Many of us start a new one in January which makes this a good month to examine and strengthen what works.

Fountain pen people may do it just for the joy of using a favorite pen or a pretty new ink. Sometimes it’s the luxurious feel of a perfectly tuned nib sliding across velvety paper. A touch of the hedonist may drive us to such pursuits, but it is good, clean fun.

It doesn’t have to be just words that make it on paper. A doodler can use a glyph or squiggle to fill lines and spaces. Watercolor may come into play, but glued on bits of ephemera count as well. Stickers, tickets and postage stamps can inspire lengthy entries or at least make the pages look satisfyingly full.

But what prompts the writer, the serious writer, to put pen to paper? What inspires that flow of words? An experience of the day, something in the news, an errant thought? Do you have a book of prompts or a theme to explore? Really, how do you do it and what do you do it with?

Writing in my journal can bring out the minimalist in me. I like using a light to medium weight pen with an ink to match the subject or something very neutral that won’t detract. Recently, four pens have graced my long sessions: two Pilot Metropolitan Mediums, a Lamy Studio Fine, and a Platinum Nice Medium. The Lamy is a little heavy for more than four or five pages, but the others are good for miles of adventure. Current inks are Iroshizuku ama-iro, Pilot Blue-Black, J. Herbin Terre de Feu and Sailor Tokiwa-matsu in the second Pilot Metro.

Today my journals include one from Paper for Fountain Pens with Tomoe River Paper, Staples Arc, a new Muji notebook and a (Midori) Traveler’s Notebook, most often a #013.

Any of these tools can prompt me to journal. Four pens, inks and journals would seem like enough variety for an inkophile. Or maybe not. The Stillman & Birn Epsilon, Stipula Verde Muschiato, and the lovely, lovely Platinum #3776 music nib are ready to go. Oh, look at that. Ku-jaku just waved at me with a charming, beauty-queen-riding-in-a-parade gesture. So much for my minimalist rotation. Is this a hopeless addiction or what!

 

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About A Muji Notebook

01/15/2017

Last weekend, John reminded me how good Muji notebooks can be so I ordered a pack to test the current version. Two days later we got acquainted and immediately became fast friends.

The notebooks are made in Indonesia though Muji’s paper can come from Japan or China. The slim, 30-sheet version is in the minimalist vein with no frills, not even labels. Each notebook in the five pack has a different colored binding. It’s a nice touch that makes it easy to differentiate notebooks.

They have a thin cardboard cover that can easily be written on or decorated. The notebooks aren’t sturdy like a hardback, but they do lay totally flat.

With fountain pen ink, there is no feathering, bleed-through and only the faintest show-through. Writing on the reverse completely obscured the almost non-existent show-through. The 6 mm line spacing should work for most writers and the smooth paper suited all nibs tested. Not one pen complained. In fact the paper was so good that it improved the performance of a scratchy nib.

Thirty sheets does make the Muji quite slim. They tucked in nicely at the back of my Staples Arc notebooks which adds to the usefulness of both.

A package of five B5 Muji notebooks is less than $9 with the A5 pack of five available for less than $8 though Amazon prices can shift several times a day. The cost could change in the time it took me to hit the “Publish” button. If you like the price, grab it while you can.

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