Posts Tagged ‘fountain pen’

h1

Neglected Pens And A Waterman Carene

08/05/2021

Once in a while conversations trigger good ideas for posts and this is one of those occasions. In the past week, two pen friends mentioned the Waterman Carene which enticed me to give mine a new chance at life. In the past, it needed too much effort to use whether from a poor choice of inks or underwhelming flow. Regardless, everyone deserves a second chance and in this case, it proved to be a good decision.

My pen is a Waterman Carene Deluxe with a factory stub nib that came my way almost twelve years ago. Since Waterman no longer offers a stub for the Carene, this is an uncommon pen. It’s a little heavy but well balanced. The nib is very stiff and solid, but smooth, and with the right ink, a pleasure to use.

A second chance is what a lot of pens deserve. So many in my collection have had little use and too few opportunities to find a best ink and paper combination. Has that happened to you? With a hundred pens and hundreds of inks, there is no way every one of them could receive the attention it deserves. So I am going to slowly work my way through the most promising prospects starting with stubs and italics. The Carene is just the beginning.

h1

Why Use A Fountain Pen?

11/06/2020

 

Some of My Favorite Things From 2014

 


Recently, I was asked why people use fountain pens. The question caught me off guard as I hadn’t given it a thought in ages. Having written with them for almost twenty years, they are just a part of who I am. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t a lot of reasons for using fountain pens. 

Value for money. A well-designed and well-built pen will last decades if not generations. I have pens that are over 100 years old and still write perfectly. Ink can also last decades. Some of mine are more than 25 years old and continue to perform as they should. 

Environmentally friendly. No detritus for the landfill, unlike gel pens, ballpoints and markers, since fountain pens get reused indefinitely. The ink comes in glass bottles that are perfect for recycling.

Variety. Pens and nibs come in lots of shapes and sizes off the shelf. Not satisified with standard models? Purchase a custom-made pen or a custom ground nib. No need to compromise when you can buy a match made exclusively for you.

Improved penmanship. Some users find that fountain pen nibs produce lines that enhance letter formations. Stubs and italic nibs are especially good for this.

Comfortable size and shape. Especially good for arthritis and other limitations. Long writing sessions can be less fatigue-producing with a fountain pen since it will glide rather than drag across the paper.

Uniqueness. Inks have a variety of characteristics from subtle shading to multi-toned, reflective coloring and many variations in between. The right nib on fountain pen-friendly paper will bring out its best qualities.

Enjoyment. Writing with a fountain pen can be cathartic and relaxing. Its use encourages time away from technology with obvious benefits.

These are at least some of the reasons to use a fountain pen. What is yours?

h1

Writing Gear Links

05/11/2020

Fountain pens and other good stuff…

From the archives.

 

h1

Sunday Reads: Edison, Italics And A Crush

07/14/2019

Confession: I can’t use a BIC without feeling like I’m slumming. Am I a snob?

Favorite traveling companions…

h1

A Fountain Pen In “Bad Taste”

01/20/2018

The Kaweco Perkeo is an entry-level fountain pen that comes in four color combinations. The “Bad Taste” model is black and a warm pink, the color of Rohrer & Klinger Fernambuk or J. Herbin Rouge Caroubier. I couldn’t resist the name. It’s kind of cool and raunchy at the same time. And an good wake-up call on a gloomy winter’s day.

“Come play with me! I’ve got trouble written all over my sleek body and colorful cap.”

Renowned for quality craftsmanship, Kaweco has been in business since 1883 so they know a thing or two about pens. The lightweight, matte plastic Perkeo is solidly made and comfortable in the hand. It is long enough to use without the cap and well-balanced enough to be used with it. The faceted snap cap is designed to rest solidly on a flat surface so it won’t roll away. All and all, it’s a well-thought-out model that should prove a sturdy companion for years to come.

The stainless steel, iridium tipped nib is stiff, but will give slightly with pressure. It puts down a consistent line thanks to its steady flow. The fine glides well with a little feedback on Rhodia paper. On junk paper, it is a little less smooth. My Lamy Safari nibs might glide a little more easily, but I prefer the grip on the Perkeo. The Pilot Kakuno is comparable in most ways except flow. The Perkeo might be a bit more controlled, but that could just be slight differences in the nibs that only someone who is incredibly picky would notice.

With a light touch, I found the Perkeo pleasant to use on any paper whether for sketching or writing. It scores bonus points for an instant start following a month of no use. That’s a significant advantage for casual writers.

The black and pink model seemed to fight with many colors of ink. However, a stroke of luck paired it with my favorite non-black drawing ink, Noodler’s Lexington Gray, and that settled its future. Not that Lex Gray hasn’t had many suitors, but the Perkeo makes an especially attractive mate and offers a very enjoyable nib for the ink.

The Perkeo uses Kaweco cartridges and converters though International carts should work as well.

Who knew a pen in “Bad Taste” would be such a find?

Your purchase from Amazon helps support An Inkophile’s Blog. Thank you!

Kaweco Perkeo “Bad Taste” fine nib

Cartridges in grey and black

Kaweco Converter

Noodler’s Lexington Gray

The Well-Appointed Desk has a review, too.

 

h1

Sunday Reads: Pens, Calligraphy, And Downton Abbey

12/03/2017

Ever wondered what is the difference between High Tea and Afternoon Tea? Downton Abbey Cooks has the details.

When it comes to frankenpens, vintage super flex with a converter sounds right for me. What combination of old and modern features would you cobble together?

h1

A Bamboo TWSBI? Yes!

07/07/2016

A bamboo TWSBI fountain pen is in the works, but you’ll have to click through to Instagram to see the prototype. It is very cool. Would you want one?

 

%d bloggers like this: