Posts Tagged ‘fountain pen’

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A Cheeky Pilot Kaküno

01/16/2023

It was a rainy weekend lacking any charm until a long ignored Pilot Kaküno crept onto my desk where it joined a collage in a Traveler’s Notebook. Someday I will find an ink to match the cap and give it the attention it is due. Honestly, who can resist a nib like this?

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Want A Gorgeous Pen?

01/02/2023

Tada! This is the Magna Carta Sapphire Grand Fountain Pen and it is on sale at Pen Chalet. Isn’t it a beauty?

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There’s A Problem With My Platinum Century Pen

06/17/2022

My beautiful Platinum #3776 Century Nice has a problem. Due to the “Slip & Seal” mechanism, ink never dries out. The pen can lay idle for months and months and still write without hesitation. Knowing it is so trouble-free, I often forget it is inked. Not for the first time, it has been filled for so long that I have completely forgotten which ink is in it. My log has been no help. The ink is a medium brown that works very well with the rose gold appointments and medium nib. The combination is so well-matched that it bears repeating, if only I was certain of the ink.

After delving into my archives, I found a photo of the pen along with others in rotation a year ago that says at that time, it was filled with Noodler’s Kiowa Pecan. Can it really have been filled for a year and write perfectly without a single skip? Perhaps I have forgotten an ink change and that brings into question the ink that is currently in it. Is it NKP or something else?

It may not be Kiowa Pecan, but that ink will do for the next fill of the Platinum Century. Plus my recording of which pen is filled with which ink needs to more consistent. How do you keep track of pens and inks? Suggestions are welcome.

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Featuring A Fude Nib

11/14/2021

Did you know a fountain pen could produce such line variation? Click the image to see the brief demonstration.

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Tweaking The Selection of Tools On My Desk

11/05/2021

Does your pen-ink-paper rotation make you happy, really happy? Mine was good but needed a little tweaking in recent weeks. Reviews are in progress for the pens and the paper listed.

  • Four Chinese pens, two fude, one fine and one extra-fine. The latter needed its nib swapped but is good now. The fine is on probation so we shall see about that one.
  • In recent months, either a pen for testing (recently a Waldmann) or a Platinum Century has occupied the last slot in my five pen rotation. Perhaps a stub will be next.
  • Inks are Iroshizuku syo-ro and kon-peki, Herbin Cafe des Iles, Diamine Merlot, Waterman Blue-Black, Sailor Tokiwa Matsu. Six but who’s counting?
  • Tomoe River 52g journal, an inexpensive A5 notebook paper that is very good with FP ink and a planner with MD  paper.
  • Uni Alpha Gel and a Tombow MONOgraph, both shaker mechanical pencils with 0.5mm HB Uni Nano Dia lead.
  • Uni-ball Signo 307 Micro (0.5) when a fountain pen won’t do. It writes on glossy paper and is water resistant. There is one on my desk, one in my handbag and one next to my bed.
  • Muji hard type black plastic eraser that doesn’t leave a pile of dust behind.
  • Other tools include washi tape, an Exacto knife, stylus, clips, candle, watercolor palette, brush, and paper.

It took a few modifications to refine my current choices. In the last six months, I have tried a few brands of paper that were supposed to be FP-friendly but were not good for double-sided writing. Iroshizuku was an infrequent visitor, but is now a staple. Chinese pens were off my list for years but now dominate my current rotation. In mechanical pencils, wide to very wide soft leads have been replaced by 0.5mm HB. A shaker mechanism taxes my hand far less than the traditional clicker so two of those have earned slots.

My desk is more organized with less clutter and instead of spending time deciding what to use, I simply use what is at hand. That means I spend more time working and that is a very good thing.

Links are to products at Amazon. If you purchase there, Inkophile may earn a tiny commission. The Chinese pens might be available through eBay, but the shipping time can be lengthy if from China. Recent orders from two different sellers took a month each to arrive in California.

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Neglected Pens And A Waterman Carene

08/05/2021

Once in a while conversations trigger good ideas for posts and this is one of those occasions. In the past week, two pen friends mentioned the Waterman Carene which enticed me to give mine a new chance at life. In the past, it needed too much effort to use whether from a poor choice of inks or underwhelming flow. Regardless, everyone deserves a second chance and in this case, it proved to be a good decision.

My pen is a Waterman Carene Deluxe with a factory stub nib that came my way almost twelve years ago. Since Waterman no longer offers a stub for the Carene, this is an uncommon pen. It’s a little heavy but well balanced. The nib is very stiff and solid, but smooth, and with the right ink, a pleasure to use.

A second chance is what a lot of pens deserve. So many in my collection have had little use and too few opportunities to find a best ink and paper combination. Has that happened to you? With a hundred pens and hundreds of inks, there is no way every one of them could receive the attention it deserves. So I am going to slowly work my way through the most promising prospects starting with stubs and italics. The Carene is just the beginning.

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Why Use A Fountain Pen?

11/06/2020

 

Some of My Favorite Things From 2014

 


Recently, I was asked why people use fountain pens. The question caught me off guard as I hadn’t given it a thought in ages. Having written with them for almost twenty years, they are just a part of who I am. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t a lot of reasons for using fountain pens. 

Value for money. A well-designed and well-built pen will last decades if not generations. I have pens that are over 100 years old and still write perfectly. Ink can also last decades. Some of mine are more than 25 years old and continue to perform as they should. 

Environmentally friendly. No detritus for the landfill, unlike gel pens, ballpoints and markers, since fountain pens get reused indefinitely. The ink comes in glass bottles that are perfect for recycling.

Variety. Pens and nibs come in lots of shapes and sizes off the shelf. Not satisified with standard models? Purchase a custom-made pen or a custom ground nib. No need to compromise when you can buy a match made exclusively for you.

Improved penmanship. Some users find that fountain pen nibs produce lines that enhance letter formations. Stubs and italic nibs are especially good for this.

Comfortable size and shape. Especially good for arthritis and other limitations. Long writing sessions can be less fatigue-producing with a fountain pen since it will glide rather than drag across the paper.

Uniqueness. Inks have a variety of characteristics from subtle shading to multi-toned, reflective coloring and many variations in between. The right nib on fountain pen-friendly paper will bring out its best qualities.

Enjoyment. Writing with a fountain pen can be cathartic and relaxing. Its use encourages time away from technology with obvious benefits.

These are at least some of the reasons to use a fountain pen. What is yours?

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