Posts Tagged ‘Noodler’s ink’

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Are You An Ink Miser?

08/16/2016

Do you hoard ink and use as little as possible? Miser or not, most of us want to get best value from the precious fluid. To facilitate that goal, Ink Miser has developed two products: the ink-shot inkwell and the intra-bottle inkwell. They debuted several months ago and have been mentioned a few times on Inkophile. If you aren’t familiar with them, let me introduce you.

The ink-shot inkwell makes it easy to fill a pen from a very small amount of ink. That makes even the most poorly designed ink bottle irrelevant. In addition, it is a useful container to hold pen cleaning fluid. My old-timers, er, vintage pens, are pleased to have a tiny spa with supporting sides for their delicate bones. Pampering does not necessarily mean spoiled and I am hoping to reap goodwill from such special care.

The intra-bottle inkwell raises the ink level closer to the bottle opening. For Noodler’s fans, it might rank as an essential tool since it makes filling from a partially full bottle easy.

Originally introduced in black, they are now available in a transparent version. Both Ink Miser inkwells are useful devices for an Inkophile though be prepared. They are a bit like chips. One will never be enough.

Luxury Brands has the details here.

Office Supply Geek weighs in on the Ink Miser.

 

 

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Winner Of The Noodler’s Berning Red Giveaway

08/14/2016

Drum roll, please. The winner of the Noodler’s Berning Red Giveaway is Angela Watson! Please contact me at inkophile@gmail.com to arrange shipment.

Have you read the entries? Some of them cracked me up. Others got me thinking about what we write with fountain pens. You guys add so much to An Inkophile’s Blog. Thank you so much for participating. And thank you to Luxury Brands USA for sponsoring this giveaway.

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Giveaway: Noodler’s Berning Red

08/13/2016

Could you use a hit of red in your ink collection? Luxury Brands USA sent a bottle of Noodler’s Berning Red to offer in a giveaway and it could be yours.

It’s simple to enter. Just leave a comment below saying how you would use this rich, red ink. This offer is open to residents of the U.S. only. One entry per person with the winner to be selected, 8/14/2016, at 7 pm PDT. The winner will have until 8/16/2016, 7 pm, PDT to claim the prize. If not, a replacement winner will be selected.

Thank you, Luxury Brands, for making this giveaway possible and allowing Inkophile to host it.

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Duke Guan Yu Calligraphy Fountain Pen

07/31/2016

Pen enabler extraordinare, Leigh Reyes, has written about the extra long Duke calligraphy nib for ages and of course she can do things with it that are both amazing and beautiful. When I saw one on eBay recently, resistance was futile.

History

Meet the Duke Guan Yu Calligraphy Fountain Pen. It has the Chinese warrior Guan Yu holding his weapon, a guan dao named Green Dragon Crescent Blade, on the cap. Also on the cap are four Chinese characters, “Zhong, Yi, Ren, Yong” for “Loyalty, Righteousness, Humanity, Valor.” Guan Yu was highly respected and eventually became revered as a god. Though Guan died in 220 CE, he continues to be honored and worshiped.

Form

The Guan Yu feels very well built and sturdy in the hand. It is mostly metal with chrome trim and weighs a substantial 40 g. The length is 145 mm closed, 125 mm without the cap, and 165 mm with the cap posted to the barrel. The balance is good so it can be used comfortably without the cap. Unlike many pens, the cap clicks onto the end of the barrel for a secure fit, ideal for those who like a long pen. However, posting the cap may overbalance the pen in a small hand. On the plus side, not posting the cap allows for a free range of motion that can produce a variety of line widths.

The barrel is a greenish turquoise like the green dragon for which the guan dao blade was named. GYT is engraved on the band along with three Chinese characters.

The logo used on the cap and clip is a crescent blade rather than the usual Duke crown. The whole design is thematic, consistent and very attractive.

The pen accepts International cartridges and comes with a screw type converter. Flow was inconsistent at first but settled nicely after a few practice marks. Writing was at its best following a fresh fill of the converter. At the very end of a fill, the pen skipped at times. Consider that an early warning that it’s time for more ink.

Nib

Sometimes this design is called bent nib or fude. Whatever you call it, the Guan Yu has a particularly long tip that makes my other Asian calligraphy nibs look puny in comparison.  It is capable of producing a stunning 4 mm line while writing a 1 mm line or even thinner when held at a more upright angle. That makes it suitable for writing as well as sketching. Hold it too upright and it will skip so it does have its limits.

Noodler’s Lexington Grey is a good match since it is more subtle than black and shades nicely enhancing line depth and variation. Just the thing for a very wide nib.

The pen has an overfeed, a strip of metal that goes over the front of the nib. It’s the first one I’ve used on a fountain pen though some dip nibs come with the enhancement. It’s designed to keep ink flowing to the nib and prevent skipping when a strong flow is needed. Given the amount of ink required for a 4 mm line, the overfeed is a a wise addition. It isn’t pretty, but it is useful.

The nib has a little flex to it probably from the length of the tip rather than by design. It takes a bit of effort to bring out the flex, but with a little practice, it is possible to mildly vary line width. I found that property more useful for drawing than writing.

Writing

The blue-green barrel closely matches Noodler’s Dostoyevsky so I used it for the first fill. A dark ink would make a very strong statement from such a wide line. Pale or pastel inks would show more substance. Dostoyevsky struck a nice balance between the pale and the dark.

If used slowly for a thick line, the paper becomes critical. Drying time can be significant on a coated paper. Rhodia worked well despite the heavy flow though there was some ghosting and a few dots of mild bleed-through. Midori Traveler’s Notebook with Tomoe River paper showed heavy ghosting and significant bleed through. Experimentation will reveal good matches of ink and paper for this very wide nib.

One note about using this calligraphy nib. Mine does not lend itself well to writing in the Chinese style of holding the brush upright. The more contact the nib has with the paper, the better the flow and the wider the line. A western style hold will produce a very broad line. The lower the angle, the better.

The Duke Guan Yu is an eye-catching pen and might get some remarks from co-workers or fellow patrons at a coffee shop. However, this is a pen that makes writing more fun than serious. It would be perfect for a doodle journal or to decorate paper margins turning something ordinary into something elegant. Then write in the center with a standard pen.

My Guan Yu came from an eBay seller in China. If you prefer Amazon, I found three offers: here, here and here. The Duke 209 Calligraphy Bent Nib has a smaller tip so look closely if you want the same nib I purchased. Leigh has the Confucius model with an extra long nib in a bamboo design. There is a black Confucius model as well.

This might not be a go-to pen, but it sure is a kick to use when you just want to play around with ink and pen in a bold and color filled way.

 

 

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Two Pens For The Price Of One

06/27/2016

For a limited time, Noodler’s is offering two pens for the price of one. It’s a great deal that includes my favorite Noodler’s fountain pen, the Konrad #10 Dixie. The second pen is the Charlie along with a glass eyedropper to fill it.

Carol of Luxury Brands USA sent a #10 Dixie Rebellion Red with a Charlie pen tucked in the Dixie’s box to introduce me to the special. Carol didn’t know the #10 Dixie Methuselah is my most oft used Noodler’s pen so a second Dixie is a real treat.

My opinion of the ebonite #10 Dixie hasn’t changed since I reviewed it in 2014 though the pen has enjoyed more frequent use than I originally anticipated. It continues to be wedded to General of the Armies ink thanks to excellent flow and a degree of lubrication that is perfect for the nib. No reason to stray from such a satisfying pairing.

The resin Charlie was ably reviewed by catbert a year ago and that will suffice for now since I don’t want to delay letting you know about this deal. If you’ve never tried an eyedropper filler, the free Charlie would be a great opportunity to do so. It holds more ink than other filling systems though it has been known to burp a drop of ink from time to time. The Charlie’s clear barrel with no obstructing filler mechanism shows an ink’s color to best advantage. Noodler’s Apache Sunset or Turquoise would be very eye-catching, but so would a lot of other inks. No two Charlie caps are the same according to the insert making each one unique.

The pen models are completely different and so are the nibs. The #10 Dixie has a #6 flex nib while the Charlie has the smaller #5 with a bit of spring to it. The tines don’t open as they would for a flex nib. However, with a little tinkering, that nib can be swapped with a flex nib from a Noodler’s Creaper.

While the Charlie pen has the typical Noodler’s aroma, if less so than some models, the #10 does not. Exposure to air helps with the resin odor, but I’ve read that storing the pen for a few days in a plastic bag filled with baking soda can be quite effective as well. As with all new pens, a light cleaning to remove any residual oil or debris from the manufacturing process is recommended.

Check with your favorite Noodler’s retailer for the two pen plus eyedropper deal. It retails for $40, but it’s a limited offer so grab one while you can.

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Sunday Links From Paper To Cursive To Butterflies

06/19/2016

Temps are headed into triple digits so it’s a good day to lay low and take it slow…

Noodler’s Rachmaninoff from Luxury Brands USA lit by flashlight. The tile is white so the ink shared its pinky goodness in every direction. My kitchen is still recovering from the shock.

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Ink Links Plus Flower And Bird Photos

04/03/2016

Totally on topic this week…

Outside my kitchen window, a late blooming camellia is attracting a lot of attention especially from the hummingbirds who nest in my yard every year. The hummers were reluctant to pose hence the old photos, but the flowers were less flighty if a bit bouncy riding on the March winds.

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