Posts Tagged ‘waterbrush’

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Lazy Day Links: Inks, A Doxie, And Seeing Red

01/01/2019

Recovering from a night of revelry? Here is some easy fare for a lazy day…

 

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Waterbrush vs Watercolor Brush

03/02/2016

Waterbrush and a watercolor brush using the same colors produced different results.

Stillman & Birn Epsilon Sketchbook on the left and a Canson XL Mix Media on the right.

The soft color and faded effect can be put to good use especially in the small confines of a journal. If you want consistent color, fill a waterbrush with watercolor or fountain pen ink. The chamber doesn’t need to be full to work well. Noodler’s would be a good choice since it is economical and can be stretched with the addition of a little water. Use the same ink in your fountain pen for a monochromatic piece. Or pick contrasting colors for playful pages. Aqua and peach anyone?

 

 

 

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Kuretake Watercolor Set

12/14/2014

Jet Pens sent a small Kuretake watercolor set that contains everything needed for colorful doodles and paintings. Combine with a watercolor tolerant journal like one offered by Stillman & Birn for an especially appealing gift.

 

Just in case five colors plus gold seem inadequate for a color lover, look at what a little mixing can produce.

What a lot of fun you can have for a mere $20!

 

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The Colors Of San Juan Streets At Dusk

09/04/2014

With eight of the paints from my newest watercolor palette, I was able to mix some muted colors that reminded me of San Juan streets at dusk. This kit holds twelve pans, takes up very little space, and travels well. It won’t hold all of my favorite colors, but a small box of extras is always an option. Painting in a café with a waterbrush, a Stillman & Birn sketchbook and this little kit is all it takes to make me a happy camper. Yeah, I’m easy.

 

This setup includes a Pilot Prera filled with Noodler’s Black, a Kuretake waterbrush, Stillman & Birn Zeta Sketchbook and a metal watercolor box containing

  • Neutral Tint
  • Hansa Yellow Medium
  • Scarlet Lake
  • Permanent Rose
  • Manganese Blue
  • Cerulean Blue
  • Prussian Blue
  • Sap Green
  • Yellow Ochre
  • Light Red
  • Burnt Sienna
  • Perylene Green

 

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I Cheated But Just A Little

03/28/2014

Taking a cue from my Colorful Background post, I sploshed some blue and green watercolors on a page in a Stillman & Birn Epsilon Sketchbook. Unlike the artist who made the video in my post, I didn’t want to write on the painting so I cheated, but just a little.

The trick was to make the words temporary without obscuring the background painting. After a few so-so ideas, I remembered a packet of translucent vellum that disappeared years ago. It took some time to locate, but provided the perfect solution.

With a Pilot Prera/Plumix Italic and Noodler’s Black ink, I wrote the Eurythmics lyric several times on the vellum until it looked suitable. A little paper tearing produced uneven edges that echoed the watercolor. Then I made another written piece using a Uchida Gold Opaque Paint Marker. With a Scotch Wrinkle-Free Glue Stick, I attached the written words to the watercolor. Lastly, a swath of gold dots on the left side and the page was complete.

The Daniel Smith watercolors are from my basic palette and include Cobalt Blue, Ultramarine Turquoise, and Green Gold with a touch of Ultramarine Blue. I may have inadvertently dipped my brush in Sap Green on one pass, so that could be added to the list or not.

Epsilon paper is 150gsm so it can handle a fair amount of liquid, but it still required quick work to keep things fresh and flowing. The Isabey Petit Gris Mop brush from Leigh was perfect for the loose wash. It holds a huge amount of paint and added to the fun of getting the colors to mingle on the paper.

If you aren’t into painting, a similar background effect can be achieved with wide or brush markers. The latter works extremely well when held horizontally, almost parallel to the paper. Another option is to doodle with Sharpies and write with a fountain pen over your design.

If you want to write with a fountain pen more than paint colorful backgrounds, Jet Pens has a fun palette that could be used to create a pale wash of color over which ink will stand out nicely. More about the Yasutomo Niji Pearlescent set next week, but it could make a good starting point paired with a waterbrush. It does take a few drops of water to get the paint thick enough to put down significant color. However, a less saturated look might be just the thing to make your writing stand out on the page.

Whatever way you go, writing over a colorful background adds pizazz to your words. If it inspires you to write, so much the better. Play with it and have fun. That’s what should happen with all artistic endeavors.

Speaking of having fun, I think I’ll add a few more gold dots. One can never have too much gold, right?

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