Posts Tagged ‘Noodler’s Apache Sunset’

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Flex Nibs And Ink Characteristics

02/10/2019

When it comes to ink, color grabs us first. Whether the jewel-toned dual colors that have emerged in recent years or the traditional single colored inks that have been around forever, it is the property we prize the most. But what else does fountain pen ink have to offer?

Prior to the introduction of inks that sheen and shimmer, more subtle characteristics like shading and outlining (sometimes called haloing) received the attention and praise of aficionados. They are natural properties of some inks that can lend the written word a very unique look.

Shading happens when ink pools usually at the bottom of a letter. The higher concentration of ink produces a deeper shade than the upper portion. Outlining is a thin, dark line around a letter and is less common than shading. Flex nibs produce it best though wide nibs can do it, too.

Writing examples that illustrate shading and outlining.

Noodler’s Standard Flex and Apache Sunset

Platinum Century FF and Iroshizuku fuyu-syogun

Namiki Falcon SF and Diamine Mediterranean Blue

Noodler’s Standard Flex and Australian Roses

Noodler’s Konrad and Blue Nose Bear

Namiki Falcon SF and Noodler’s Kiowa Pecan

Noodler’s Dostoyevsky

Esterbrook 9128 with Namiki Blue

Platinum Music Nib and Diamine Sepia

 

Diamine Sepia will outline well, but paper may matter more with it than the other inks.

There are too many inks on the market these days to test them all so my list is rather short. You may find inks you already own will outline when used with a soft or flexible nib. There are a few relatively inexpensive fountain pens that would be up to the task of testing ink, but in that category, I only have experience with Noodler’s Standard Flex Pen. It might be better called a soft nib, but it will, with a little practice, produce enough line variation to tease an outline from an ink that is so inclined.

A thread at FPN offers more suggestions. I have used a few of the inks mentioned but have experienced different results or at least less dramatic results. Diamine Wild Strawberry is a case in point. It is excellent in my Platinum Century Nice medium nib with good performance all around. Though it produces crisp edges, the outlines are so close in color to the ink, that they are only discernable under magnification. Thus it outlines but not in a meaningful way. Some of the other inks mentioned in the FPN thread look promising and several are truly dazzling especially those from Robert Oster and Blackstone.

Does outlining appeal to you? Let me know if you discover an ink that does it well. Not that my ink collection needs to be expanded, but for outlining, I could make an exception or two.

 

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Sunday Reads: Pens, Memes, And Sherlock Holmes

11/18/2018

There is no connecting the dots between these links, except that they were some of the most interesting ones from this past week.

Noodler’s Standard Flex Pen With Apache Sunset Ink

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Links From Erasers To Pens To A WWII Dagger

07/10/2016

No bad news in this lot of links…

Noodler’s Clear Standard Creaper Flex Pen with Noodler’s Apache Sunset Ink

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More Orange In Pen, Ink And Other Forms

02/13/2015

One of these days I’ll get over my love of orange, but not today.

I’m not the only one either. Amazing orange ink swatches.

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How Did This Happen?

11/16/2014

Times certainly have changed. My rotation of mostly black pens has been invaded by demos sporting jewel toned inks. How did this happen?

The term demo or demonstrator comes from pens with clear barrels that were used years ago to reveal or demonstrate the inner workings of a fountain pen. Stores might have had a few, but not customers. In the past ten years or so, clear pens have become available from a few manufacturers and have caught the fancy of many collectors.

I used to avoid demos thinking the potential for stains would make them high maintenance and only good with low maintenance inks. While that may hold true for some pens, those in my collection tolerate a variety of inks and have shown no signs of staining with normal pen hygiene.

The Lamy Vistas don’t get much use due to inconsistent flow so they are semi-retired. But thanks to the generosity of Luxury Brands USA, a Platinum Nice M (pink gold), a Nice Pur B (rhodium), and a Noodler’s Ahab Flex have nudged aside more mundane black pens. With three grades of nibs, I hardly need anything else. Well, except for the Platinum #3776 music nib. When I want a bold line, nothing is quite as sweet.

Seeing colorful ink at a glance is a gentle reminder of what’s in store when a pen is put to use. The Nice is inked with Waterman South Sea Blue and the Ahab is inked with Noodler’s Apache Sunset. The Pur is awaiting a fill. What do you think would be luscious from that broad nib pen?

Demos haven’t overwhelmed my rotation so far, but the more somber black pens aren’t happy to be displaced. Do you suppose they will be exceptionally well-behaved to maintain their dominance? Now wouldn’t that be a nice turn of events.

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Which Ink Makes You Happy?

02/11/2014

It doesn’t have to be just one ink, but which ink makes you happy? It could be any characteristic that does it for you or a combination like color and shading. Turquoise and orange do it for me along with the sort of flow that makes the nib glide.

I have touted Diamine Mediterranean Blue for years. It’s a bright turquoise ink that leans more blue than green. It has good flow and makes a lovely companion for my Platinum #3776 music nib. I am not usually so loyal, but Med Blue has charmed me for years. The pen and ink haven’t been mates for quite some time as the music nib is one of my best pens for ink tests. Might have to find another pen for that purpose and let the two friends take a holiday together.

Elaine from Jet Pens sent a bottle of Iroshizuku kon-peki yesterday, so I have a new turquoisy ink to consider though ku-jaku is number two on my list for turquoise/teal. Will it be replaced? Probably not, but kon-peki is coming on strong. More on that in a few days.

Noodler’s Turquoise Eel might be just the thing for narrow nibs, but I’ve never used it. The urge to order ink is growing stronger and this ink is one of the reasons.

Orange is a bit more complex. Diamine Sepia is an earthy orange-brown that is a fun ink especially with its shading and outlining. It loves the #3776, but it has enjoyed a wide variety of mates over the years. For a more true orange, Noodler’s Apache Sunset is hard to beat and its one of the best shading inks for flexible nibs. When I am in a mood for ink closer to red or pink, Diamine Vermilion will do though it isn’t a lubricating ink.

That’s my short list. Now it’s your turn. Which ink or inks make you happy?

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Noodler’s Pen And Ink Make A Happy Duo

01/28/2014

Late last night the urge to refill the Noodler’s Standard Flex Pen struck. Apache Sunset hasn’t seen daylight for a long time, so this was a good opportunity to revisit an ink that has an outstanding reputation for use with a flexible nib. I was not disappointed.

Noodler’s Creaper pen and Apache Sunset ink at Amazon.

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