Posts Tagged ‘Midori paper’

h1

Speedball Elegant Writer Is A Cheap Thrill

01/15/2016

Playing with the Speedball Elegant Writer is a lot of fun. Just grab a wet brush and make it dance around the paper. The more water the better so a paper of at least 150gsm will make the best surface and yield the most satisfying results, but Midori and Tomoe River paper like it, too. Four pens for less than $10 makes this an inexpensive tool for journal decorating or mixed media art. I predict much doodling ahead.

h1

Brush Pen Writing Samples

12/20/2015

Brush pens are fantastic for swirls and doodles as well as lettering and sketching. My small collection earned a bit of exercise this week with the Midori providing the platform. The birds were intrigued, but kept their opinions to themselves.

h1

Playing With Ink

10/12/2015

Some folks play with their food. Not me. I’d rather play with ink and paint.

 

Platinum Pen from Luxury Brands USA. Kuretake Waterbrush and Midori Traveler’s Notebook from Jet Pens.

h1

Two Stub Nib Pens That Were Almost Created Equal

08/07/2015

Recently, a TWSBI Diamond 580 1.1 Stub arrived to join my wide nib collection. The other stock nib model I’ve purchased in the past year is the Conklin Duragraph 1.1 Stub. How do they compare?

Although the pens look very different, both retail for $55 and discounts can be found on the Duragraph. They are the same length capped though the TWSBI weighs slightly more. Uncapped, the TWSBI is longer. Neither needs posting and both are well balanced without the cap. Build quality is good for both and better than expected for the price. Either should last a very long time.

Essentially the pens are comparable except for the filling mechanism. The 580 is a piston filler while the Duragraph is a cartridge/converter filler. The latter screws in which is uncommon and will help keep the converter properly seated. However, the piston does hold more ink – not a bad thing for a wide nib pen.

The nibs on both models are sold as 1.1mm stubs. Neither has tipping material and the nibs are formed from steel. Both models are smooth though the TWSBI has a very modest amount of feedback. The stealth nib on the amber Duragraph has even less feedback. Perhaps that comes from the black coating, but it is minimal and should be irrelevant to most any user. The uncoated steel Duragraph nib has virtually no feedback if that is your preference.

The corners of the Duragraph are more rounded than the 580 and it has a stronger ink flow. Because the nib is a true stub, it can tolerate some rotation without reducing that flow. Lines do not suffer from missing areas even when writing rapidly. The line quality in the images suffered slightly due to the pen needing a refill – not from poor flow. For some combinations of ink and paper, the flow may be too strong to dry in a reasonable amount of time. If you like a juicy nib, this one will do nicely.

The 580 nib has sharper corners and produces a slightly more crisp line. Consequently, the nib has a smaller sweet spot and does not tolerate rotation to the same degree that the Duragraph does. In other words, to achieve consistent lines, the nib needs to be more dead-on. It has less flow than the Duragraph, but that means more inks and papers should work well together. It isn’t lacking flow – it’s just not as wet as the Duragraph. The line is wider by approximately 0.25mm. For someone new to stub nibs or for someone who applies too much pressure, this nib might dig into the paper, something easily resolved by using a lighter touch.

I was asked which is the better pen. It isn’t that one is better, but they are different. In the hand, the TWSBI feels chunkier or maybe it is more solid. The Duragraph looks more traditional and has a larger nib. The shape of the grip fits my hand very well which makes it suitable for many hours of use. When writing for my own purposes, the cracked ice Duragraph does the job admirably. It glides across the paper and has become my standard against which all other stock stubs are measured. When writing correspondence with a bit of italic flair, the TWSBI would be the one. My daughter prefers my writing with the amber Duragraph and Noodler’s Antietam. Perhaps her artist’s eye sees something I don’t. However, the images show little difference. If you want to try out a stub, either will do.

Time for a caveat. The two Duragraphs arrived ready for work. The 580 had an issue that took a day on FPN to sort and resolve. Since TWSBI has had some trouble in the past with pen parts breaking, I was reluctant to tinker with it. But with suggestions from FPNers, I was able to make the pen work without causing damage. The bottom line with a TWSBI is don’t over-tighten it as cracks may develop. Customer service is good about making things right, but it’s better to proceed with caution and never need a repair or a replacement part.

Remember that nib grinding, whether by machine or by hand, is a delicate undertaking. The most minute variation can turn a nib into a stinker. Consider that should your experience with these pens differ from mine. Also, read the seller’s return policy in case you get a damaged pen. I ran into a very restrictive one recently and was put off by it for future pen purchases.

If these pens appeal to you, the Duragraphs were purchased from Pen Chalet and the TWSBI was purchased from Jet Pens though a number of retailers stock them. If your order doesn’t meet the minimum to qualify for free shipping, add an ink that shades well and you’ll be good to go.

Oh, if you wondered about the paper, that’s a Midori Traveler’s Notebook Grid Insert #002 sent by Jet Pens for an upcoming paper review. The Celtic i-clips holding the pages open were purchased at Amazon.

h1

A Glimpse At Midori Paper And Fountain Pen Ink

04/03/2015

Japanese paper and fountain pen ink can be the best of mates as proven by these initial photos of a Midori Traveler’s Notebook from Jet Pens. Is love too strong a word?

More to come this month on grid notebooks and how useful they can be for keeping a journal whether you are well-organized or live a fractured lifestyle as I do.

h1

Goodies From Jet Pens

02/14/2015

Received some goodies from Jet Pens this week.

The Midori MD Notebook paper is very promising with no show-through, bleed-through or feathering from nine inks tested so far. There is a small degree of ghosting on the back of the paper, but it’s very acceptable, even attractive. The plain cover begs for decoration and I have washi tape and Decopatch waiting in the wings. The simple grid allows for any use. More on this no frills journal in future. However, of the three grid format journals I’ve tested this year, the Midori MD Notebook is the most fountain pen friendly of the lot.

The Midori stickers are tiny and about twice the height of my handwriting or one to two 5mm grid blocks in the MD Notebook. Cute for putting a little charm to a journal entry. I purchased a small Kuretake Waterbrush to try my hand at some lettering and for small doodles in my daily journal. The Kyoei Orions Shitajiki Writing Board will be used to protect underlying pages when I use any sort of brush in a journal. This is the A5 size which should work in most of my notebooks. For larger formats, it can be turned sideways to cover half a page at a time. I would have preferred a grid style, but was unable to find one in suitable dimensions.

A small order to be sure, but one that hit all the right notes to encourage writing with a fountain pen.

h1

Coffee, Tea And Wrapping Gifts

12/14/2014

The gift wrapping hack blew me away. Two packages in 28 seconds?

I don’t always drink tea, but when I do, it’s usually Earl Grey.

%d bloggers like this: