Posts Tagged ‘Jackson’s Watercolors’

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Jackson’s Professional Watercolours

04/02/2014

Jackson’s Art Supplies sent a box of Jackson’s Professional Watercolours months ago and it has been a real pleasure getting acquainted. Whether the assembled kit or a custom set based on your specifications, the paint is artist quality and reasonably priced which makes it suited to the novice as well as the pro.

My box of full pan watercolors:

471 Chinese White PW4 PW6 – Series 2
103 Lemon Yellow PY3 – Series 2
129 Naples Yellow PY 35, PW4, PW6 – Series 2
160 Cadmium Red Light PR108 – Series 5
187 Genuine Carmine PV19
257 French Ultramarine Blue PB29 – Series 2
277 Phthalo Green Deep B.S. PG7, PB 15 – Series 2
282 Hooker’s Green PG7, PY83 – Series 2
362 Burnt Sienna PBr7 – Series 1
382 Venetian Red PR101, PY43 – Series 1
424 Payne’s Grey PBk7, PB15, PV19 – Series 2
445 Ivory Black PBk9 – Series 1

Highly pigmented watercolors can be toned down by adding another color like Neutral Tint, but muted or less saturated colors cannot be made brighter. Artist quality paints contain more pigment which is one of the best reasons to purchase them. All of the paints in my Jackson’s kit are very saturated though Burnt Sienna took more effort than the others to reach its full potential.

The plastic pans that hold the paints are identical to those from Daniel Smith, so they will fit many boxes besides those from Jackson’s. There is a sticky label with the item number, color name, and pigment formula on the bottom of each pan. Each color arrived individually packaged in a tiny plastic bag. It’s up to you to assemble the pans in whatever order suits your style. The plastic tray comes out easily so the box can be thoroughly cleaned without harm to the paint. There is a slot for a full-sized brush and four wells for mixing colors. The box opens flat so it is well set up for painting on the road.

My kit came with a different set of paints than the set pictured on the website. However, you can get the same light-weight metal tin free when you order your own selection of colors. It’s the best deal I’ve seen for a custom palette.

Jackson’s Watercolours are preserved with honey in addition to the usual gum arabic. Just as it can make the paint flow better, honey can cause it to harden more slowly. For those who fill pans with tube paint to set up their own kits, note that the paint may stay soft longer than you might expect. Store your kit in a horizontal position so the paint doesn’t migrate. The formed cakes don’t flow unbidden, but the surface can stay moist for days.

Like other brands of paint, Jackson’s did benefit from pre-wetting. A light spritz of distilled water from a spay bottle and a minute later, the colors were ready to go, fully saturated and at their peak. Jackson’s Watercolours have a lovely depth and brilliance. They mix easily for lively colors and produce clear pastels when diluted. Genuine Carmine is the only color used for the flowers which demonstrates the range it can achieve.

The blue blob was painted with French Ultramarine, Phthalo Green Deep, and Hooker’s Green to see how the colors would flow together.

The trees were painted to play with the range and to test a couple of new brushes. The center painting was done with an Isabey #0 Mop while the others were done with a variety of brushes. The 6 x 9″ paper for the left and middle paintings is Canson XL Aquarelle 300gsm. The sketch on the right is on a scrap of junk paper. The main colors are Lemon Yellow, Cadmium Red Light, French Ultramarine, Hooker’s Green, Burnt Sienna and Payne’s Gray.

Often I put together a simple palette with three paints and then let the resulting mixes suggest the subject. Mediterranean landscape on a stormy day? Desert at dawn? Mountain range in autumn? Tea and biscuits on a cafe table? Three colors are all it takes. There are no limits save skill at execution. Make it an abstract or loose interpretation, especially in a journal, and skill becomes less a factor.

If color moves you, then make that the focus. All you need is a watercolor kit like Jackson’s, a brush for washes, a detail brush, paper and a cup of water. It really is as simple as that. Add a fountain pen with a neutral ink to put words on your painting and you’ll have a mixed media composition. You may not consider yourself an artist or painter, but you are a creative person as your journal will attest.

My thanks to Jackson’s Art Supplies for sending the watercolor kit and giving me the opportunity to explore what their paints can do. My doodle journal will never be the same.

Note that the last image is watercolor on Tomoe River paper, but done with a dry brush since the paper is very thin. Still I must say it held up well with only a tiny amount of buckling that was easily pressed out tucked in a book.

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Jackson’s Watercolors Meet Tomoe River Paper

03/14/2014

More experimentation with watercolor and ink last night with Tomoe River paper, Jackson’s Watercolors, and Noodler’s Black ink. The paint was fully dry before writing over it with a fountain pen. The paper buckled surprisingly little for its weight and held up much better than expected. Of course, Noodler’s Black is perfect on Tomoe River, but that’s no surprise. No doubt many inks would work well, but I like the crisp look of black on watercolor. My Paper For Fountain Pens journal with Tomoe River paper was not destined for life as a Doodle Journal, but perhaps I underestimated its capabilities. Hmmm.

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Green With Watercolor

02/21/2014

While working on a very long review of Jackson’s Pan Watercolours, I took a break and played with some Daniel Smith and American Journey tube paints.

The idea was to allow the colors to mix on the paper rather than mix them on the palette. The former produces a more variegated, fresh color rather than a flat, single tone.

Paper has an influence on the result and the less smooth the paper, the more textured the result. The paper in this case is in a 6 x 9″ spiral journal of Aquabee Super Deluxe Heavyweight Drawing Paper, 150gsm. It has a “textured surface with excellent tooth” and does make fountain pens write quite dry. But with a brush, it’s a great place to doodle in color.

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A Few Links Plus A Short Story

01/12/2014

I’m on my second used Volvo and would take that wagon in a heartbeat…

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The Good Stuff On My Desk

01/08/2014

What I’m working on and with today.

On my desk

Paperblanks Journal
Jackson’s Watercolors
Isabey Petit Gris 6234 #0 Brush
Daniel Smith 44-08 #3 Kolinsky Brush
Autopoint Mechanical Pencil
Stillman & Birn Epsilon Sketchbook
Tomoe River paper from PaperForFountainPens.com
Noodler’s Standard Flex Pen with Noodler’s Black Swan in Australian Roses
Pilot Prera with Plumix medium (italic) nib and Noodler’s Black
Sheaffer Taranis with Diamine Steel Blue
Platinum #3776 music nib with Diamine Sepia
All overseen by a cloisonne bird that belonged to my mom

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G’bye 2013 – Hello 2014

01/01/2014

Pens, inks and paper make a terrific hobby, but you already know that. Writing about them is my way of sharing the fun of using these tools. You make it worth the effort and for that I thank you.

Some names and numbers…

Thank you for the generous donations that helped keep Inkophile going last fall. My hobby has become a financial challenge. Really. Who wouldn’t want the newest colors of ink and several pricey pens every year? Sometimes retailers or manufacturers offer their newest creations or items they want to move off the shelf for review and that’s very much appreciated. When that doesn’t happen, I would like to purchase new items. Sponsorships and other sources of funding would allow me to do that. So moving forward, there will be some changes at Inkophile. Hopefully, that won’t estrange too many readers, but if you fancy an unsupported pen blog, there are plenty in the sidebar from which to choose.

As my interests have evolved, so has the content of my blog. Watercolor painting plays third fiddle to writing and using fountain pens, but painting in my journal has made it an integrated hobby. If nothing else, the addition of lively color to my wordy journal entries is a creative embellishment that is both intriguing and satisfying. More to come.

This is my favorite doodle of the year. It started as two comma shaped lines at the top and the rest was pure luck.

Copyright © 2013 Margana Maurer. All Rights Reserved.

Gene Kelly in Rose Ink

May your new year be filled with joyful dancing and colorful friends. Hello 2014!

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That’s A Wrap For 2013

12/29/2013

Some items new for 2013 along with favorites from years past:

The List

The Images

Ink Comparison

Writing ink

Noodler's Lexington Gray and Kiowa Pecan
Drawing ink – Noodler’s Lexington Gray and Kiowa Pecan

Platinum Century Fountain Pen
Round nib fountain pen – Platinum Century B

Platinum #3776 Music Nib
Stock stub or italic exotic nib – Platinum #3776 music nib

Namiki Falcon SF
Stock flexible nib – Namiki Falcon SF on Rhodia paper

Levenger True Writer Kyoto Stub
Custom stub or italic – Levenger True Writer Masuyama stub

Pilot
Brush pen – Pilot “New Brush in Character” in a Stillman & Birn Epsilon Sketchbook

Paperblanks Journal
Most beautiful journal/notebook – Paperblanks Maya Blue Ultra Silver Filigree

Watercolor Tools
Watercolor brush – Isabey 8234 Petit Gris Squirrel Quill Mop #0 and #2, Daniel Smith 44-08 Kolinksky Sable #3 and #5
Watercolor tube paint – WN Scarlet Lake, Cobalt Violet, Permanent Rose and DS Green Gold
Watercolor pan paint – Jackson’s Genuine Carmine, French Ultramarine Blue

So that’s what’s on my list. What made it to yours?

Note: Reviews of Tomoe River paper, Paperblanks journals and Jackson’s Watercolors are in the works.

Note: Three programs emerged as incredibly useful, Evernote, Janetter for Twitter and MalwareBytes. Spotify is my choice for music and OmmWriter for distraction-free writing.

Historical Note: In 1884 Lewis Waterman developed the fountain pen. He took 10 years to perfect his invention.

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