Posts Tagged ‘doodle journal’

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Miquelrius Ink And Watercolor Tests

01/10/2015

Much to my surprise, the Miquelrius journal paper handles watercolor from a waterbrush better than ink from a wide fountain pen nib. Admittedly the brush was on the dry side, but still there is a lot of doodling that can be done this way. Note that there was no bleed through. The show through is on par with the weight of the paper and similar to Tomoe River.

As for my continuing pen and ink experiments, a Lamy Safari EF with Noodler’s Black has proven the best match so far. Noodler’s General of the Armies works well, too. Some inks feather while others bleed through enough to make the back of the paper useless. However, at the price point of around $10 and for the amount of paper, these journals could be used up and trashed without regret which makes them perfect for having a little fun with ink, paint, stamps and some other doodads. And fun is what it’s all about.

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Doodles, A Playful Puppy And Pepe Le Pew

01/04/2015

Sometimes you just have to go with the flow…

Happy, happy, joy, joy.

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A Dog, Scarves, Ink And A Journal

11/30/2014

Spent more time writing and less time surfing, but I did find a few items worth sharing…

 

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Monologue Notebooks And Paper Quality

11/03/2014

Monologue offers a variety of notebooks and was kind enough to send several for review. Their generosity provided ample opportunity to test two grades of natural white paper, the 80 gsm ruled and the 140 gsm blank version. There are pluses and minuses to each.

The form is very well executed for all of Monologue’s notebooks. Details are available elsewhere and there was nothing disappointing in my use of their products. Okami covers the subject very well so head over there for info on those attributes.

Monologue Platinum

Notebooks in this line include elastic closures, ribbon bookmarks, pen loops, and inner pockets. Some have paper with gilded edges for those who like a little bling. The handsome bronze covered notebook above is pictured with a Platinum #3776 Century Nice fountain pen, an eye-catching couple to be sure. All of the notebooks have unadorned covers with the Monologue imprint placed low on the back cover. My favorite is the green Contrast Ruled Notebook with its orange elastic closure that is perfect with orange ink and an orange fountain pen. (Don’t mind me. It’s a seasonal affliction.)

My experience with the paper is slightly different from Julie’s. My acid-free, 80 gsm Platinum notebook showed less bleed-through and show-through though performance was inconsistent. Finer nibs produced the best results and Noodler’s Black with a Lamy EF was perfect. Other inks and pens were almost as good displaying faint marks on the reverse. Diamine Royal Blue, Violet and Aqua Blue as well as Sailor Nioi-sumire are worth recommending. Unfortunately, there was mild feathering with a few inks from wide or free-flowing nibs.

All other writing instruments tested had no issues though they did produce very faint show-through at a level that would not interfere with writing on the reverse. I wouldn’t call it even a whisper and for writing purposes it would be insufficient to bother me.

Monologue Basics

Monologue Basics paper is great for fountain pen ink as well as art tools including light washes of watercolor. The acid-free, 140 gsm Italian paper is heavy enough to tolerate a decent amount of abuse. The texture claims to be rough but I found it quite smooth. The binding is sewn and the book will lay flat, an important feature for the artist. The paper did buckle with paint from a traditional brush, though it did not buckle when using a waterbrush. It really gets down to how much water is applied to the paper. Dry media like charcoal and graphite won’t trigger that effect. Even crayons will do nicely. Journals are made for having fun, no?

A notable difference between Monologue Basics sketchbooks and most other brands, is that the paper is perforated. Detach a sheet and it won’t affect other pages. That makes it easy to remove a drawing that turns out especially well or to hand a sketch or notes to a companion. So much better than a napkin or the back of an envelope and the paper has no issues with fountain pen ink.

Both grades of paper have lots of applications. The variety of sizes and forms is another plus. Monologue should appeal to both those who journal as well as those who make a journal an art form.

More at Pens, Paper, Inks…Whatever! and On Fountain Pens and Life Imitates Doodles.

 

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Add Some Character To Your Journal

08/22/2014

Simple, elegant figures from Louis Decrevel: Gesturefest! This is just a small sample of his work, but it demonstrates a range of heartfelt responses to all kinds of things that go on in everyday life. With a little practice, it would only take a few figures in your creative arsenal to add new character(s) to your journal entries.

gesturefest

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An Antidote To Bad News

08/16/2014

Banish the world’s woes for a few minutes with an upbeat journal entry and a splash of brilliant color. Consider it a restorative and no doubt you deserve one.

This month orange and turquoise have been happy distractions from the turmoil outside my sphere of influence. Diamine Aqua Blue in the Platinum Century Chartres Blue broad nib and J. Herbin Indien Orange in the Platinum #3776 music nib along with some hits of Daniel Smith Permanent Orange watercolor made this happy page.

Not an artist? Me either. But anyone can decorate with colorful doodles or fill in different elements like a kid with a coloring book. In this case, coloring outside the lines is totally acceptable – even desirable.

If you aren’t ready to create a mini-masterpiece, go abstract. Put down some shapes and lines with a waterproof ink. Then fill it in with markers or paint.  Enjoying a time out at your local bistro? Even black coffee applied with a spoon, straw or toothpick will do in a pinch. Sometimes let it get away from you with drips and spatters that create unexpected results. Who says art must be tidy? It is whatever you make it.

The only requirement is that the paper will withstand your choice of tools. Below I’ve used Stillman & Birn Sketchbooks and Strathmore Windpower Sketch. The former is high quality while the latter is inexpensive. You can tear out the pages of the Strathmore if the results don’t meet expectations. However, it can be useful to retain disappointing entries to appreciate your progress and you will progress. Just keep at it. The more often you are creative, the better you will get at it. Promise!

 

 

 

 

 

More journaling inspiration from Susan Gaylord,  maria mercedes trujillo a, observeclosely, Marsia Bramucci, and Mia.

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Locating Writing And Painting Subjects

06/17/2014

Even if you aren’t hitting the road for a summer vacation, there is an unlimited source of material for both writing and painting thanks to Google Maps. The 360° view makes finding just the right scene easy.

Googles Images is another source for inspiration.

Yesterday, I went to Glencoe, Scotland.

Tomorrow it will be Provence.

I think it will be Fiji at the weekend.

Not only can I paint these locations, but I can write about them even if only to practice my use of descriptive language. A travel journal might be a good combination of the two. A little prose next to a watercolor sketch sounds like a great way to fill a Stillman & Birn journal. So those are my travel plans for summer. What are yours?

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