Posts Tagged ‘diamine ink’

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Brilliant Summer Inks And Watercolors

07/14/2014

Usually by June, my tools get pared to a minimum. This year things have gone the other direction.

Instead of a limited three to five ink selection, my rotation is getting a color infusion. For inspiration, there is a swatch on my desk to remind me what is on hand. It isn’t a watercolor palette, but it has the same come play with me effect.

  • Sailor Jentle Peach Pink
  • Noodler’s Purple Martin
  • Diamine Emerald
  • J. Herbin Ambre de Birmaniestil
  • Diamine Teal
  • Waterman Blue-Black
  • Noodler’s Kiowa Pecan
  • Sailor Jentle Nioi-sumire
  • J. Herbin Lierre Sauvage
  • Diamine Aqua Blue
  • Iroshizuku fuyu-syogun
  • Noodler’s Lexington Gray

Elaine from Jet Pens sent a bottle of Sailor Four Seasons Nioi-sumire (Sweet Violet) and Karen at Exaclair has promised bottles of two J. Herbin inks so my rotation will be changing in short order. Now to find an empty, italic pen for some doodling in my Stillman & Birn sketchbook.

Along with modifying my ink rotation, summer is a good time for some colorful experimentation with my watercolor palette. Starting with a dozen basic paints, I added another dozen that I seldom use. That leaves a few empty slots for new acquisitions. My choices are brighter than usual and painting with them will provide a good challenge for the next few months. Even so, I included a modifier, Neutral Tint, just in case a color shouts a bit too loudly.

Certainly a palette needs to be functional, but it can also benefit from visual appeal. This Kremer is a good example of that. The beautiful arrangement encourages playful interaction.

A girl’s gotta have fun you know and what better way than color infused days. Love you guys, but the muse is calling. See ya later!

 

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Summer Inks For A Limited Rotation

06/06/2014

It’s starting to feel a lot like summer and a good time to put together a new rotation. Matching nibs that don’t dry out quickly with inks that suit the season takes some planning. Orange, turquoise and pink will get added to the black and gray already at hand. In hot weather, ink can evaporate and leave a clogged nib, so the number of pens on my desk gets reduced to half its usual size. Five or so will be plenty.

Some likely prospects:

  • J. Herbin Ambre de Birmanie
  • Diamine Coral
  • Diamine Vermilion
  • Iroshizuku yu-yake
  • Iroshizuku kosumosu
  • J. Herbin Rose Tendresse
  • J. Herbin Rose Cyclamen
  • J. Herbin Larmes de Cassis
  • J. Herbin Bleu Pervenche
  • Diamine Aqua Blue
  • Waterman South Sea Blue
  • Diamine Mediterranean Blue
  • Iroshizuku ku-jaku
  • Noodler’s Turquoise
  • Iroshizuku chiku-rin

Chiku-rin and Blue Pervenche are beautiful together but I have too little of the latter so I would have to order that one. Kosumosu and chiku-rin are small samples, but good for a fill or two. Time for a few swatches.

That was useful in settling on a short list.

  • Diamine Coral
  • Iroshizuku kosumosu
  • Iroshizuku chiku-rin
  • J. Herbin Bleu Pervenche (preferred) or Diamine Aqua Blue (on hand)

How do you put together your seasonal rotation?

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It’s March And Green Reigns Supreme

03/06/2014

There is no lack of green ink for those who fancy the color. Every March I wade through swatches looking for just the right shade for the current year and the fountain pen in waiting.

Over the weekend Diamine Emerald got the nod for the Pelikan M200 OB. Yesterday a bottle of J. Herbin Lierre Sauvage (a gift from Karen at Exaclair) called very loudly to the Noodler’s Konrad flex nib. Who was I to keep them apart?

Have you succumbed to the green and if so, which ink and pen are paired as your intrepid duo?

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On My Desk – February 2014

02/27/2014

Well, sort of. These are the inks in use today from the assortment of pens on my desk. The tally is telling with seven of nine in the blue family. The nibs are with one exception in the wide range and only the Platinum and Lamy nibs were not tweaked in some way. The paper is the outstanding Tomoe River from PaperForFountainPens.com. It might be unfair that it makes every ink and nib look good, but that’s hardly a complaint.

March is the month in which green ink invariably gets a twirl. This year it will be either J. Herbin Lierre Sauvage or Iroshizuku Shin-Ryoku or possibly both. Now for the pen. Italic or flex? Which would you choose for green ink?

The ink colors could be more saturated and the paper is actually a warm white, but adjusting the scan might make it less honest. So no adjustments this time.

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A Little Diamine In My Pen

01/25/2014

Diamine has always offered excellent ink and in recent years expanded to offer one of the most varied color catalogs in inkdom. So I was happy to accept a bottle of Raw Sienna from Jet Pens for review.

The substantial Diamine range of browns makes it difficult to settle on just one favorite, but Raw Sienna makes my short list along with Sepia, Dark Brown and Chocolate Brown. The latter is the most saturated and the slowest to dry, but those two characteristics tend to happen together. Sepia and Dark Brown have gone in and out of my regular rotation for at least eight years

Then there is Raw Sienna. It is a neutral, medium shade that shows no ghosting or bleed-through on the usual assortment of papers. It takes magnification to see just a tiny amount of feathering or imperfect outlines on pineapple or copy paper. No issues on high quality paper so don’t let the fuzz put you off.

The color swatches around the ink’s name are watercolors applied with a brush. The purpose was to see how well the ink color matches the name. It lacks the orange hue of raw sepia watercolor and is closer to burnt umber. However, there is no law that says an ink name must have any relationship to reality and whose reality would it match anyway.

Diamine Raw Sienna is understated and makes a good match for a wide nib especially since it has some shading to offer. Highly saturated, bright colors demand attention, while Raw Sienna invites a cozy friendship. A page of it says the writer took the time to select an easy to read color that is warm and relaxed. You can send me a letter in it anytime.

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My Core Four Plus One

01/09/2014

My desk is always a disheveled mess except for my fountain pens. Those I keep tidy and at the ready for whenever the muse strikes. However, with product testing, the number of inked pens can grow well beyond anything manageable, so I’m separating the lot into two groups with my Core Four Plus One the most accessible. Others employed mostly for testing purposes have a tray in which to snooze until needed.

Core Four Plus One is a name for four of my most used fountain pens plus one mechanical pencil. The four pens are the mostly likely to get used either for the ink or the fun factor of using that particular pen. The Platinum #3776 music nib is the anchor. For now the other three pens are the Noodler’s Standard Flex, the Pilot Prera Italic and the Sheaffer Taranis Medium. Those four provide a good variety of nibs and pen sizes and changing between them is good for my hand. The inks are Diamine Sepia, Noodler’s Black Swan in Australian Roses, Noodler’s Black and Diamine Steel Blue. Again this is a good variety for maximum appeal though all of it is subject to change on a whim.

The Autopoint mechanical pencil is the Plus One. It gets more use than any fountain pen since it doesn’t need to be uncapped, can write on any paper, and is erasable, an important benefit for a fickle writer.

When I head out with pens in tow, I have a two-pen case for an intrepid duo or a four-pen case for the whole lot. An Autopoint MP is always in my handbag along with a black Sharpie Pen so I am never caught out without writing tools. A small Rhodia pad completes the ensemble. An inkophile should be prepared, yes?

Do you have something like my Core Four Plus One? If so, what’s in your primary rotation?

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That’s A Wrap For 2013

12/29/2013

Some items new for 2013 along with favorites from years past:

The List

The Images

Ink Comparison

Writing ink

Noodler's Lexington Gray and Kiowa Pecan
Drawing ink – Noodler’s Lexington Gray and Kiowa Pecan

Platinum Century Fountain Pen
Round nib fountain pen – Platinum Century B

Platinum #3776 Music Nib
Stock stub or italic exotic nib – Platinum #3776 music nib

Namiki Falcon SF
Stock flexible nib – Namiki Falcon SF on Rhodia paper

Levenger True Writer Kyoto Stub
Custom stub or italic – Levenger True Writer Masuyama stub

Pilot
Brush pen – Pilot “New Brush in Character” in a Stillman & Birn Epsilon Sketchbook

Paperblanks Journal
Most beautiful journal/notebook – Paperblanks Maya Blue Ultra Silver Filigree

Watercolor Tools
Watercolor brush – Isabey 8234 Petit Gris Squirrel Quill Mop #0 and #2, Daniel Smith 44-08 Kolinksky Sable #3 and #5
Watercolor tube paint – WN Scarlet Lake, Cobalt Violet, Permanent Rose and DS Green Gold
Watercolor pan paint – Jackson’s Genuine Carmine, French Ultramarine Blue

So that’s what’s on my list. What made it to yours?

Note: Reviews of Tomoe River paper, Paperblanks journals and Jackson’s Watercolors are in the works.

Note: Three programs emerged as incredibly useful, Evernote, Janetter for Twitter and MalwareBytes. Spotify is my choice for music and OmmWriter for distraction-free writing.

Historical Note: In 1884 Lewis Waterman developed the fountain pen. He took 10 years to perfect his invention.

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