Archive for the ‘Paper’ Category

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Can A Pen Be Too Fine And Other Links

06/15/2014

For your reading pleasure…

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And The Giveaway Winners Are

05/31/2014

Thank you all for participating in the G. Lalo Notecard giveaway. Selected by Randomizer, the winners are

  1. kp
  2. Larry U
  3. Jeremy
  4. Beth Treadway
  5. Mark

Please send your address to inkophile*at*gmail.com for gift fulfillment by Karen at Exaclair.

Happy note writing!

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G. Lalo Giveaway Ends Saturday

05/30/2014

If you haven’t already done so, post a comment to the original G. Lalo Giveaway announcement to enter. The drawing will be 5/31/2014 at 6pm PDT with five winners, so the odds are in your favor.

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J. Herbin Rose Cyclamen Meets Kyokuto Expedient Notebook

05/29/2014

It’s that time of year when pink wriggles its way into my rotation. With excellent timing, Karen at Exaclair sent a bottle of J. Herbin Rose Cyclamen while Elaine at Jet Pens offered a Kyokuto notebook and the two became fast mates. Not Karen and Elaine. The ink and notebook.

J. Herbin Rose Cyclamen

The images tell the story well enough, but a few points bear mentioning. Rose Cyclamen is a strong pink. Nothing pale or wimpy about it. It is on the cool side with a blue bias that stands out on while paper, but softens a bit on cream colored paper. It has good coverage, but no shading from the Platinum #3776 music nib. Even from a fine nib, it should provide strong color. Especially during the summer, I prefer it to red for editing or margin notes. But if you’re going to use Rose Cyclamen for correspondence, it should be to a really close friend, really close, or your intentions might be misunderstood.

The color was difficult to photograph. On my monitor it is a bit too bright. The color on the bottle is more accurate so go by that.

J. Herbin makes some very pretty inks and Rose Cyclamen is a memorable one in its lineup. If you like pink, this one should make you happy and be a good mate for any pen. Just ask my Platinum #3776. It keeps asking for more. Really!

Kyokuto Expedient Notebook

The B5 Kyokuto Expedient Notebook is available in three colors, black, silver and white in ruled, dot grid and plain styles. The form is excellent with a plastic cover, stiff cardboard back, double ring binding, and rounded corners. White paper and gray lines make the ruled Expedient a neutral fit for any ink color. There was a little feathering from some inks, but I’ve seen Diamine Emerald and Teal misbehave elsewhere. The paper is very smooth and the 7mm line spacing excellent with my stubs and italics without any scaling back on my letter forms.

However, there is a caveat with fountain pen ink. Most produced considerable bleed and show-through though my trusty Sharpie Pen suffered no such indignities. I have no explanation for the lack of such problems with Noodler’s Black and Zhivago. The pen used with the latter has a rather dry nib, but the one used with Black has an average flow. Rose Cyclamen and Waterman Florida Blue performed the best of the remaining inks. Gel pens and ball points should present no issues. Narrow felt tips will work, but pens that lay down a lot of ink are iffy.

The white paper and gray lines are perfectly suited to pencil especially wide soft lead for which I admit a weakness. On Expedient paper, my Autopoint mechanical pencil with 0.9mm HB lead glided effortlessly and produced a satisfying line.

I absolutely love paper that works with all inks, but this isn’t one of them. If you don’t mind a few uneven outlines here and there, and you only use one side of the paper, the Expedient could work well for you. Some of the inks I use the most showed no issues, so it will fit in my rotation especially for pencil notes and that’s something that happens every day.

Thanks, Karen and Elaine, for the opportunity to test your products. Your generosity is much appreciated.

 

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It’s Links Day!

05/18/2014

A few choice tidbits…

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G. Lalo Coreale Notecards And A Giveaway

05/17/2014

According to The New York Times, “the handwritten gratitude intervention seems to be experiencing a moment of vogue.” What a stuffy way to say note cards are making a comeback! Regardless, from Jimmy Fallon to Ralph Lauren, this form of person to person connection is on the upswing and a welcome counter to the mechanical means of communication to which we have become all too accustomed.

Want to participate? Regardless of the tool with which you choose to write, quality counts so use a heavy card stock like G. Lalo Coreale Notecards. The paper is 250g card stock and features deckle edges. Coreale comes in Lagoon (blue), Taupe, Lilac, Fuchsia, Ivory and Grey in packets of ten cards with tissue-lined envelopes. The stock performs beautifully with fountain pen ink so no limits in that regard.

With five colors to express any sentiment and a few well chosen words, you can make a memorable impression, soothe a troubled friend, acknowledge a job well done, share a quote, make someone feel truly special or be a bit cheeky and really stand out.

Exaclair, U.S. distributor of G. Lalo products, is offering a giveaway to five Inkophile readers who want to try Coreale Notecards in Lagoon. To enter just post a comment and a sentence or two about how you would use them. This offer is open to residents of the U.S. only. One entry per person with five random winners to be selected on 5/31/2014 at 6pm PDT. Each winner will have until 6/15/2014 to respond. If not, a replacement winner will be selected.

Thanks, Karen, for the opportunity to try Coreale cards and sponsoring the giveaway. You’ve been a good friend to my blog. More reviews and giveaways to come.

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Markings Journals Meet Fountain Pen Ink

04/22/2014

Three C.R. Gibson Markings journals have been on a shelf waiting review for more than a year. To be sure they are attractive which could be the reason they never got properly filled. My used journals are destined for the recycle bin and Markings are just too nice for that fate. But since you guys like paper so much, putting them to the test made a good project for this month.

The first is a Markings sketchbook (MASA-2) with a Monet Waterlily Pond cover. It contains 130 pages lightly ruled on one side and blank on the reverse. The paper is 6.8″ x 8.9″ and held together with large double rings. Line spacing is 7.5 mm and pale blue so it doesn’t interfere with writing. The paper is soft white and has no tooth but does have a somewhat velvety texture. It’s a comfortable surface for fountain pen nibs and good with other writing instruments as well.

Ink did not show through or bleed through so double-sided use is assured. This is a very nice notebook I will enjoy filling.

The two bound Markings journals are the same style though sporting different covers, one leather (MJ5A-1) and the other embossed metallic (MJ5A-3). Each has 240 pages, a storage pocket, elastic band closure, ribbon marker and lays remarkably flat. Both journals look great and are well made for the price though the 6 mm line spacing might prove too narrow for wide nibs.

The paper color is slightly more yellow than Moleskine though the lines are identical in spacing and color. The weight is similar to Moleskine, but the paper seems to be lightly coated which causes fountain pen ink to suffer inconsistent coverage. Some inks feathered significantly and all of those tested bled through except Noodler’s Black. A Sharpie Pen in black performed well, so other writing instruments ought to get along fine with these journals.

These Markings journals are readily available, attractive and well-made, but unreliable for fountain pen use. Since the feathering and bleed-through are evidence of ink incompatibility, a narrow nib won’t improve performance enough to get a recommendation. However, the right ink will write well enough even with a o.7 mm nib.

What’s the takeaway from these pen tests? Don’t expect uniform paper performance from a manufacturer. Frustrating? You bet. Waste of money? Yep. Add to that the variability of ink performance and it’s hard to recommend any brand without reservation though there are exceptions.

Not for the first time this year only Noodler’s Black performed well. It’s reassuring that there is at least one pen on my desk that should write on most anything. However, it is not fun when my other pens are loaded with pretty inks that won’t work with the journal at hand. Better to stick with what has earned the approval of my inks and pens. That makes me more productive and my pens much happier. Go team!

 

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