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A Blue Screen And The Platinum Century Chartres Blue Pen

12/23/2012

Well, it happens even in the best of families. My ancient computer died and I don’t know when I will be able to purchase a new one. So for now my Sunday links post will take a holiday while I make do with very, very limited computer access and no social media playtime. If you need to get in touch, try email. Snail mail is welcome, too.

On the upside, testing inks and pens will go on though reviews might be slow to get posted. Just to console myself last night, the beautiful Platinum Century Chartres Blue B nib went into my rotation loaded with a cartridge of Platinum Pigment Blue. Thanks to Dick Egolf of Luxury Brands USA, I have too many pens inked and must write more than usual to keep them happy. Is it any wonder my computer felt unloved? But that thought got me wondering. Just who or what put the death spell on my computer…

Oh, first impressions on the new pen and ink duo? Beautiful, smooth, balanced, and very blue. If you are a collector, purchase one soon to get a serial numbered card indicating your pen was manufactured in the inital run. It won’t cost more but it is kind of cool.

Platinum Century Chartres Blue Fountain Pen

Platinum Century Chartres Blue Fountain Pen

Platinum Century Chartres Blue Fountain Pen

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11 comments

  1. I bought this pen and ink, too. It’s such a beautiful blue (both the pen and the ink). I also got the Shoji and the Bourgogne, both beautiful as well. I love Platinum pens and their wonderful nibs.

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    • That’s quite a haul. Lucky you!

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  2. What is the plastic like in these pens? I have a #3776 Music and the plastic feels cheap compared to my other Japanese pens (Sailors and Pilot customs).

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    • Dave, I wouldn’t call it “cheap” but it is a light weight resin. For my needs, that’s a good thing. There is no Pilot Custom 74 here for comparison but the Century does seem to weigh less than the 742 or Sailor 1911. I will look into that further in my full review.

      M

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      • A demonstrator pen is always lighter by there nature. I like a light pen as well but my #3776 Music feel platisticey if you know what I mean – especially when screwing on the cap. Where my Sailor 1911 and Pilot Customs do not.

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        • Without a Sailor or Pilot demonstrator to make an “apples to apples” comparison on the “feel” of the material, I can say that the build quality is quite in line with what I expect of a Japanese pen. It isn’t the same as a Sailor or a Pilot, but neither are those two identical. I find Sailor pens to be heavier and the nibs quite different from Pilot or Platinum.

          Note that my Pilot Custom 74 pens got sold and the 742 FA is welcome to leave home, too. I even sold a Sailor Sapporo this year and another one three years ago. The remaining Sailors would get sold if I didn’t think I should keep them for comparison purposes. But the Platinum Century is a keeper as is the #3776 Music nib. Admittedly, nibs matter more to me than appearance and that may influence my opinion as much as anything else. Aren’t nibs what fountain pens are all about? Being pretty is just icing on the cake!

          The filling system and the length of time a Century can go without use even with a fill of Platinum Pigment Ink sets it apart but more on that when I post a full review.

          M

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  3. Very nice, Margana. Thank you.

    Dick

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    • My pleasure, literally!

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  4. [...] Fountain pens, ink, paper and more « A Blue Screen And The Platinum Century Chartres Blue Pen [...]

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  5. Still prefer the Bourgogne – but at least I now understand the card that came with it!

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  6. [...] A Blue Screen And The Platinum Century Chartres Blue Pen Are Modern Japanese Flex Nibs Created Equal? Can A Platinum Pen Satisfy A Chunky Nib Fan? Lots Of Goodies In My Review Queue Want the Platinum Chartres Blue Fountain Pen? Here’s The Deal! [...]

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